IMAIM asked in News & EventsCurrent Events · 6 years ago

Can someone explain the Nevada rancher standoff? Also, what is the current status of the standoff?

Update:

Is this correct-

- The Bundy family has owned a 600,000 acre ranch near the boarders of Utah and Arizona since the late 1800's.

- In 1993, the Bureau of Land Management reclassified his property to "protect a desert tortoise" (allegedly)

- Bundy was then forced to pay a monthly fine of $1.35 per cow-calf pair to graze public lands that are also home to imperiled animals such as the Mojave Desert tortoise.

Update 2:

- He then refused and now the BLM has swopped in to size his cattle.

Is this the basics of the story?

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  • 6 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    No, the Bundys own 160 acres of land and once leased 154,000 acres under an ephemeral (not good land) grazing lease. In 1993, his maximum number of cattle allowed was reduced to 150. He refused to pay fees for that lease after 1993, so the BLM cancelled the lease and closed the allotment to grazing. Bundy continued to use the allotment without paying for it. The cattle spread to a different area that totals over 500,000 acres, and which is mostly closed to grazing. The BLM sued in federal court in 1998, and won. Bundy appealed and lost. The BLM tried negotiating with Bundy to no avail. In 2011, the Clark County Sherriff told the BLM that they needed a more recent order to enforce, so in 2012 two separate orders were granted by the court for Bundy to remove his cattle and any improvements.

    Bundy decided in 1993 that the US had no jurisdiction over him. He tried paying the fees to Clark County, but the county refused to accept them. Nevada has a law that says all federal land belongs to the state -- that law has never been enforced or tried in court. (The US Constitution's Supremacy Clause and the Properties and Territories Clause, and the Nevada State Constitution all say the law is null, so it would likely lose in court.) Bundy claims to be following that law.

    The situation de-escalated when the BLM agreed to back off and the Clark County Sheriff negotiated a settlement with Bundy, terms currently unknown.

    The rumor that Harry Reid and a Chinese solar energy company had something to do with this is false. That project was 170 miles away in Laughlin, it was Clark County land not federal land, and the project was abandoned as non-profitable.

    Source(s): Court documents. Ask for links.
  • Big K
    Lv 7
    6 years ago

    It's over, the BLM gave back the cows and gave up saying the tension was too much for them to handle. Oh and all over the internet liberals are crying about a failed corporate landgrab, quite a reversal from their usual position eh? I guess when it's a working white man "social justice" doesn't apply.

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    • Whatever4
      Lv 7
      6 years agoReport

      Bullshit. The local Nevada news is reporting Clark County Sheriff negotiated a stand-down to prevent bloodshed. It's not over.

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  • mac
    Lv 7
    6 years ago

    Ok, so a few years back Harry Reid and his son started making this huge 5.5 billion deal wwith a Chinese company to build a solar plant on this guy's land, it also belongs to blm. The only problem with the rancher, is he has not paid anything since 93. So he has been not paying his bills, but it really comes down to nevada Congress man trying to make big bucks selling this land to foreign investors, well, when the American public finds out this whole mess......The government knows all hell will brake out all across America. ......politicians of this a hole are bringing America to its knees and selling us out

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  • 6 years ago

    The rancher has refused to pay for grazing fees for over 20 years.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    It was about states rights and grandfathered rights. The over-stepping federal BLM has finally retreated with their tails between their hind legs.

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