Do you like the song Live and Let die?- what does it meen..?

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  • Jeff J
    Lv 6
    6 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    "Live and Let Die" is the main theme song of the 1973 James Bond film Live and Let Die, written by Paul and Linda McCartney and performed by Paul's band Wings. It was one of their most successful singles, and the most successful Bond theme to that point, charting at number two on the US Billboard Hot 100 and number nine on the UK Singles Chart.

    Commissioned specifically for the movie and credited to McCartney and his wife Linda, it reunited the former Beatle with the band's producer, George Martin, who both produced the song and arranged the orchestral break. It has been covered by several bands, with Guns N' Roses' version being the most popular. Both McCartney's and Guns N' Roses' versions were nominated for Grammys. In 2012, McCartney was awarded the Million-Air Award from Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI), for over 4 million performances of the song in the US.

    Source(s): Wikipedia - It's a great song! ;)
  • 6 years ago

    Great song. The title comes from the James Bond novel the movie was loosely based on. Instead of 'live and let live' it became 'live and let die'. Probably alluding to the cold calculated killer that James Bond was.

  • OBXMAR
    Lv 6
    6 years ago

    Listen to the words in the original Paul McCartney version and watch the James Bond movie. Instead of "Live and let live", sometimes you need to "Live and let die".

  • 6 years ago

    Here is an extract from Live And Let Die by Ian Fleming

    "This case isn't ripe yet. Until it is, our policy with Mr. Big is 'live and let live'."

    Bond looked quizzically at Captain Dexter.

    "In my job," he said, "when I come up against a man like this one, I have another motto. It's 'live and let die'."

    I believe it has a similar meaning to Everything or Nothing - give it everything or get nothing out. Live And Let Die - live for the mission and risk death.

    Source(s): 'Live And Let Die' by Ian Fleming. Chapter IV: The Big Switchboard
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