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Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 6 years ago

Service dog training tips?

I have a 5 month old dog who I am training to be a service dog for anxiety. I was wondering if any one else has done this or known someone who has and would give me some advice. He is doing very well so far but I need some tips

Also does anyone know what kind of certification he needs to go to school. My doctor therapist and psychiatrist have all said I need him at school . Any tips or suggestions?

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  • 6 years ago
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    The ADA legal definition of disability is at http://www.ada.gov/pubs/adastatute08.htm#12102 Summery at http://www.ada.gov/ada_intro.htm

    "...defined by the ADA as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, a person who has a history or record of such an impairment, or a person who is perceived by others as having such an impairment. The ADA does not specifically name all of the impairments that are covered."

    ADA definition of a service dog is at http://www.ada.gov/service_animals_2010.htm

    "Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA."

    Service dogs do not not need to be professionally trained or to come from a special service dog training program. They can be home trained IF the owner knows what to do. It will be harder and take longer then you think it will. But there is no test, no certification, no legal standards required for your dog except the loose ADA requirements.

    None of the self appointed "experts" here are qualified to say you are or are not disabled or whether you do or do not qualify for a service dog. You need to consult with your doctor and disability counselors, not some anonymous yahoos who don't know you or what they are talking about.

    Some people here seem to think that they are the only people who should have service dogs, some simply lie for the sake of lying. This is not the place for a serious answer.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Go here for the best dog training couse http://dog-training.gelaf.info

    Since it is obvious that you do not have a clue about obedience training, your services should be for free. You cannot train even an adult dog for 8 hours a day. About the most that can be done at any one time is 10 - 20 minutes and that is with an adult dog and not a puppy. The attention span on this baby is extremely short and training session should be no more than 10 minutes and twice a day. Additionally, there isn't going to be much learned if you will only be training for 5 days. Obedience training is cumulative and is done over a much longer period of at least several weeks to several months.

    What you can charge is determined by your experience, reputation, and accomplishments and in a case like this, should also include guaranteed expectations. Just working with dogs over several years, is not the experience that is necessary to be a dog trainer. There are too many people who are putting that title to their name and fleecing the public. Don't be one of them.

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    It's the owner that needs to learn how to train the dog, so sending it away to be trained means it will work for the trainer, but when it gets home the owner will probably do everything wrong and the dog will not respond correctly. Learn how to train your dog obedience https://tr.im/tp2Ok

    Part of the fun in having a well trained dog is learning to train it correctly yourself. That is also the most rewarding. Some people send dogs away for specialist training, like sheep herding, protection work or gundog training, but even then, that is the lazy way out and good trainers do their own training to get what they want from their own dogs.

    However it is always more productive to train your dog under a good instructor, especially if you are not experienced

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Hello,

    A five months old puppy is definitely very young and can learn fast. I don’t know whether it is the right age of service dog training, but I can suggest a really good dog training school. I trust Cali K9 San Francisco as I got my bulldog trained from them, and he is just fantastic. You can talk to them and get an expert advice.

    Thanks

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  • 6 years ago

    Until the dog has finished all training (which generally takes 18-24 months, it doesn't need to go to school with you. Outings should start out short and increase in duration as the dog matures; being ready to leave/remove the dog from the situation/location if the dog acts out or becomes unfocused/stressed is important. Most teachers and professors expect you to give your undividedattention while in class, not concentrating on training the pup.

    Source(s): Service dog handler currently traning a successor dog
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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    In any given situation, focus on what you do want your dog to do instead of on whatever he’s doing wrong. Learn how to train your dog https://tr.im/dogtrainingcourse

    For example, suppose that on many evenings, your young dog gets busy looking for trouble just as you’re digesting your dinner. He grabs a boot from the mat by the front door and gallops through the house with it. You yell at him and take it away. He grabs its mate. You yell and take it away. He heads for the kitchen and starts checking out the counters in case something tasty’s been left behind. You chase him away. And on and on, until you’ve lost your temper and torn out clumps of hair you can ill afford to lose.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    You should definitely attend a dog training course if you want to stop these unwanted behaviours. A good one I found online is http://www.goobypls.com/r/rd.asp?gid=572

    It's really well made (it has a lot of videos), simple and effective. I recommend it.

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  • 6 years ago

    You can't have a service dog and need to stop lying and claiming your PET is something it is not. Its called fraud and you can be arrested for it

    A service dog is for disabled people, having anxiety does not make you disabled so by law you can't have one. You will be tossed out on your ear by store owners since you cant take you PET dog into stores and will end up in a boat load of trouble

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  • 6 years ago

    I am currently having a psychiatric service dog in training....and by what you said you CLEARLY are BS'ing your need for one. If you are consulting a psychiatrist/therapist then THEY ADVISE YOU on what type of tasks this dog would be trained to do to MITIGATE your mental health illness.

    And does our anxiety constitue you as disabled by ADA standards? (if your able to hold down a job, or go to school successfully then you are not considered mentally disabled)

    I.E. some of the tasks my dog is being trained to do are: Ground me during flashbacks (PTSD releated), bring me back to reality during dissociative states (ptsd related) via physical stimulation by licking my hand, interrupt OCD behaviors and interrupt self-harm behaviors (both of which I CAN NOT CONTROL or do on my own...AND these behaviors severely limit my daily functioning). Alert me when someone is approaching me from behind since this nearly always leads to either a panic attack or a dissociative state. And when in large crowds she is trained to create a barrier between me and other people.

    These are all trained tasks to help MITIGATE my disability so I can function in society. There are pros/cons to having a service dog and trying to manipulate the system by getting one for a mild-moderate mental health issue is very insulting and even mocking those with actual disabilities.

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  • 6 years ago

    No such thing as a service dog for anxiety, and a 5 month old puppy is too young to even be evaluated for potential, its certainly too young to begin formal training. Nice try, but your pet has to stay at home

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