Grammar use: "Journey of" vs. "Journey as" and why?

Hello,

I'm a native speaker. I saw this on a wedding invitation and know that it is wrong, but can't put my finger on why it is so:

"In love's journey we unite and take this journey of husband and wife"

I am about 99.9 percent sure that it's supposed to be "journey AS husband and wife"

Can someone give me a good explanation as to why this is the case? Why "as" is right, and "of" is wrong (if it is)? Thanks!

Update:

Hello,

I'm a native speaker. I saw this on a wedding invitation and know that it is wrong, but can't put my finger on why it is so:

"In love's LIGHT we unite and take this journey of husband and wife"

I am about 99.9 percent sure that it's supposed to be "journey AS husband and wife"

Can someone give me a good explanation as to why this is the case? Why "as" is right, and "of" is wrong (if it is)? Thanks!

Update 2:

*****

Yup, made a mistake the first time.

So "journey of" husband and wife is correct? When I thought the phrase would be used like "journey of discovery" or "a journey of a thousand miles. . ."

I appreciate the try. I think it's wrong as written because there's the ACTION of doing something (We take the journey) then describe the condition by which they are doing it (they are doing it AS husband and wife). They are describing the action and how the action will be carried out, not the journey itself.

6 Answers

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  • Dopler
    Lv 7
    7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Those sentences have two different meanings. The original sentence is definitely clumsy at best, so I can't be sure which meaning the happy couple was aiming for.

    I'll rewrite the original sentence with less awkward words:

    "In love's light, we unite and take this journey of partnership."

    Maybe that's not the best word either, but it's possible that this is what the married couple meant. The point is, using "of" here means that the modifier is somehow describing the journey.

    -What kind of journey is it? It's a journey of partnership/love/commitment/etc.

    As another example, a pair of brave knights might set off on a journey of valour. A soul-searching widow might go through a journey of sorrow.

    In the second sentence, using "as husband and wife" is describing "we", the pronoun.

    A pair of knights: "We take this journey as master and protege."

    Widow: "I take this journey as one half of a broken whole."

  • jlb777
    Lv 6
    7 years ago

    If you take the journey and the role the husband and wife have in that journey as two distinct thing then it should be as not of. The jouney is one OF love and the man and woman take it AS husband and wife. Another example could be a journey of education. An undergraduate takes a journey of education as a student to receive his degree.

  • Bazza
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Two people fall in love, and together (united) they take love's, and life's journey.

    BUT - if they MARRY, then they take that journey, not as a couple shacked up together, but AS husband and wife. That's why there's a wedding!!

    The wedding invitation seems to be one more example of how so many Americans don't really understand the meaning of what they are saying/writing. If they did, they wouldn't say:

    Take the book off of the shelf.

    He returned back from holiday.

    It lowers down your self-esteem.

    By some stroke of miracle,...

    ......and one from yesterday, on the CI channel, in one of those Actuality crime programs, and uttered by a police chief:

    I had saw him on countless times...

    IT IS HEARTENING THAT YOU DO, that you saw the error.

    Addit: Ahhhh....you've changed the sentence. And I like it even less!!!!!!!!!

  • 7 years ago

    I think they meant to say 'as'. However, there is a case to be made for 'of'. This journey of husband and wife might refer to the jouney that all married couples take. In other words, we take this journey of husband and wife that so many couples have taken before us, for good or for ill, for richer or poorer etc. It could be recast as follows: We take the husband-and-wife journey. Clumsy? Sure, Unlikely? No doubt. But possible? Oh yes.

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  • 7 years ago

    To say that they were taking a journey of husband and wife is not exactly incorrect, just implies a slightly different meaning. It is more referencing a more (for want of a better word) stereotypical or common journey that partners have taken in the past.

    To say "In love's journey we unite and take this journey as husband and wife" would be more grammatically awkward in its phrasing. To use "as husband and wife", the sentence would have been better formed as "We unite as husband and wife to take love's journey."

    "In love's journey we unite and take this journey of husband and wife" is rather bizarrely formed, however not incorrect.

    I hope this helps :)

  • 7 years ago

    I changed my mind. You're probably right. If they wanted to use 'as', they should say "this journey of marriage". Perhaps they really do mean 'of', but "journey of husband and wife", while it probably is okay, is a little awkward.

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