RJ
Lv 7
RJ asked in Society & CultureRoyalty · 7 years ago

Why was Kate Middleton confirmed in the Chapel Royal?

Majesty magazine states that Kate Middleton was confirmed in the Chapel Royal prior to her marriage to Prince William.

What was the purpose for Kate being confirmed?

Is being confirmed in the Church of England similar to being confirmed in the Roman Catholic tradition?

Was the confirmation made so that Kate was accepted as a member of the Church of England?

8 Answers

Relevance
  • Clo
    Lv 7
    7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Catherine was raised in Church if England, formally baptized, but never did the formal confirmation. She was confirmed at the Chapel Royal at St. James:

    http://newsfeed.time.com/2011/04/14/kate-middleton...

    So, with her wedding cake chosen and plans for her wedding dress sorted, Kate staged a secret confirmation near William’s private offices on March 10. “Catherine Middleton was confirmed by the bishop of London at a private service at St. James’s Palace attended by her family and Prince William,” Clarence House said in a statement. “Miss Middleton, who was already baptized, decided to be confirmed as part of her marriage preparations.”

    Confirmation is becoming a complete member of the Catholic and Anglican Churches. Since William will one day be the titular head of the Church of England, and his children need to be Anglican as well, it was a necessary step for Catherine to take. She was already Church of England but needed to take the rite of Confirmation to be a complete member of the faith.

  • Clive
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Her husband is almost certainly going to be Supreme Governor of the Church of England in due course, as the British monarch always is, so it was seen as advisable for her to become a full member. Clearly she hadn't been confirmed before or it wouldn't have been necessary.

    It is very similar to Catholic confirmation, in that it is your personal decision to confirm what was said at your baptism and become a full member of the church. The service itself, as I know because I've been confirmed in the C of E, is virtually the same (laying on of hands by a bishop), and is a requirement in the C of E for receiving communion. THAT is a consideration now I come to think of it, as without confirmation she would not be able to receive communion. At the coronation, the newly crowned monarch receives communion and as Kate would be crowned alongside William, she would be expected to receive it too. So now she's all set for when the time comes.

    There are only two let-outs: confirmed members of other churches may receive communion in the C of E, and those "ready and desirous to be confirmed" may receive it so they don't have to wait - but it is the duty of the priest to point out that they can't go on doing that forever and should be confirmed at the next opportunity.

    I know the Catholic Church does First Communion before confirmation, but the C of E restricts it until after confirmation. Normally an Anglican's first communion will be the communion during their confirmation service, and confirmation is at generally a slightly later age than in the Catholic Church if you've always been going to church.

    RUKiddingtoo makes the point that it is normally required, in the Catholic Church, to be confirmed to be married - certainly it would be expected as otherwise you cannot take part in the nuptial mass, and the priest would have to use the Rite of Marriage outside of Mass. This doesn't apply in the C of E, where the only requirement is to be baptised, and the marriage service rarely includes communion anyway. The Book of Common Prayer is in fact written in the expectation that it should. If you read the marriage service in it, it sort of comes to a sudden screeching halt without a proper ending, because the Communion Service is expected to immediately follow. But that is almost never done and the priest just wraps it up with final prayers and a blessing.

  • 7 years ago

    It is probably similar to be confirm in the Catholic tradition. Catholics have to be confirmed before they can marry in the Church as well. Kate probably hadn't received her confirmation in the Church of England as a child or teen and, therefore, had to receive it before she married William. It was probably just easier and faster than a regular person. She was probably already baptized a member of the Church of England and had received all the other sacraments, if there are any, of that church. Therefore, she was already an accepted member of the Church of England as one who has to be confirmed in the Catholic Church before being married in the Catholic Church would be. It's just a sacrament that is normally received before one is married. If she hadn't already been an accepted member of the Church of England, she probably would not have been an acceptable fiance for William.

  • 7 years ago

    There is no great mystery the Royal family for the main part participate in the rites of the Church of England in high church and that requires both bride and groom to be confirmed, I myself was confirmed by the Bishop of Carlisle at Easter 1986 before marrying in Ascot in June 1986, and I was one of 18 people to be confirmed prior to marrying in high church.

    Source(s): I come from Windsor
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Probably the same as in the Catholic church. When one is baptized at birth there can be no pledge to follow that church for the rest of ones life "Confirmation" is just that, to consciously confirm ones commitment to that church for the rest of ones life (hopefully)

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Tradition and politics, she is in line to be the future Queen 3

  • TSK
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Like MOST of us she was NOT Cof E.....NOT confirmed 100%....

    @EDWARD..DROP the Jewish thing..GOLDSMITH is an OLD ENGLISH name..Even if were, so what???

  • 7 years ago

    majesty ALONG WITH ALL THE WRONGFUL MEDIA WRONG..SHE HAD TO BE CONFIRM INTO William RELIGION.SHE IS NOT CONFIRMED A AS ROYAL OR A ROYAL ...

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.