Isn't this like saying you can't be a good citizen if you don't believe in fairies and gremlins?

Pat Smith was surprised to hear that a clause in the Texas Bill of Rights bars atheists from office.

Smith, the president of the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Lubbock's board of trustees, said the law is outdated.

“There is separation of church and state, and which church someone belongs to or whether or not they attend a church should not affect their ability to serve,” she said.

In 1961 Torcaso v. Watkins, a case similar to the current events in Asheville, went to the U.S. Supreme Court. The court exercised separation of church and state by ruling in favor of a Maryland atheist seeking public appointment.

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    I don't care, but I wouldn't trust an atheist.

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  • 7 years ago

    There is a part of the Texas Constitution that requires holders of public office to take an oath demonstrating a belief in a higher being. Of course this is a very old part of the constitution. If they actually tried to bar an atheist from taking office then there would be a fight in the courts about it and Texas would find itself on the losing side.

    The only example I know of someone trying to use this piece of law was in the aftermath of an election for a city council or something. The guy who won was an atheist. His opponent quite often attacked him on the subject during their debates and so forth. He believed that there was no way an atheist could win the election. However, the atheist did win. The other guy tried to use the courts to block the win saying that the Texas Constitution required that oath. However, the court did not take him seriously at all. That was a few years ago. Maybe 10-15? I do not remember the city or the names of the people though so you have to take this with a grain of sodium chloride.

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  • 7 years ago

    Well duh.....if you don't believe in gremlins then you can't gremlin proof the public works....I would NOT vote for anybody who was not actively fighting the sabotage of gremlins.....

    But on a more serious note, in my country such a law would end up being struck down, it should not have to go all the way to the supreme court. It is a clear violation of our charter of rights & freedoms.

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    No. Its saying that there was an outdated clause which needed to be amended so that atheists (whom claim they are not a religion) can have the same religious freedoms as anyone else.

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  • 7 years ago

    No.

    Although the law seems unconstitutional, you use a logical fallacy as part of your question.

    It is unfair to compare the Creator God (who is believed in by at least 2/3 of the world's population) with fairies and gremlins (who are believe in by fewer people than there are Atheists in the world).

    With love in Christ.

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  • Raatz
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    It's not "outdated," it's unconstitutional.

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