Google Play Music and FLAC?

A couple of questions. Thanks to Bandcamp, I'm (barely) starting to become an audiophile. I just looked up that FLAC is compatible with Google Play Music, but I saw that it is transcoded to 320kbps mp3. This does mean that should I download my library, it would all have lost the FLAC format, right? Should I give up my aspirations to have good audio quality? Should I find a different program to play my music? (I like that I have all my music online, where I can listen to it on my phone without using all my storage.)

Update:

Edit: Also, I should add that my laptop is really old, and very slow. I'm expecting it not to last too much longer, and that's kind of why I was hoping my FLAC stuff could be safe online, since I'm pretty tight on cash right now to upgrade my laptop or buy an external hard drive.

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  • 7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Hi,

    MP3 is a lossy format, in other words; information is lost in order to reduce file size. FLAC is a lossless format; so data is still lost, but unlike MP3 it doesn't have a determintal sound loss compared to the original WAV file.

    It's not really just the filetype and bit-rate that matters:

    - True audiophile's tend to stick to analog formats like vinyl, as this produces the most detailed and rich sound. Any digital formats like CD or compressed MP3 they are likely to avoid in anyway possible. I'm not a true audiophile but even the recent albums like Muse's The 2nd law sounds richer on vinyl than on CD.

    - The original source may already be compressed or levelled like they are on a compilation album. The best sound quality is often found on the original artist albums.

    - The music you listen to can determine the need for FLAC. Most modern music (for example electronic dance music) is so over-engineered, that it sounds the same regardless of what decent bit-rate you have it at (above 128/160) and what equipment you play it on.

    - Remastered albums can sometimes be worse or better than the original album releases. It differs from artist to artist really.

    You could use an online storage solution where you are able to keep your files in the original lossless form. Dropbox is good because you get 2GB initially for free, but you can expand the free storage if you do stuff like recommending the service to your friends. And dropbox it's available for you, forever. Sites like Megaupload have audio fingerprint technology to help prevent copyrighted files shared to others.

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Google Music Flac

  • hillis
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Google Play Music Flac

  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Google Play Music and FLAC?

    A couple of questions. Thanks to Bandcamp, I'm (barely) starting to become an audiophile. I just looked up that FLAC is compatible with Google Play Music, but I saw that it is transcoded to 320kbps mp3. This does mean that should I download my library, it would all have lost the FLAC format,...

    Source(s): google play music flac: https://biturl.im/y94RH
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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    If you have perfect hearing and are using state of the art audio equipment you may be able to discern some slight differences between a 320kbps MP3 file and a FLAC file. Most people most of the time will not find any differences between them. Unless you made the FLAC file yourself (ideally directly from an original studio source) you have no way of knowing what was used as a source file. A 320kbps MP3 can be saved as a FLAC file and you would be appreciative of the superior quality you can "hear".

    Basically it is all bullshit and baloney tinged with a large sprinkle of snobbery.

    Enjoy the music rather than fretting over the delivery medium.

    http://lifehacker.com/5903625/mp3-or-lossless-see-...

  • 7 years ago

    You can try putting it on MegaUpload or Dropbox or similar sites that aren't going to transcode the files.

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