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Thoughts on University of Riverside?

This school is not my first choice, but my mom said I probably will have to goto a college close to home so I can commute because dorms are too expensive...so any reviews on this school?

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  • JQuick
    Lv 7
    8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    "University of Riverside" is a private, for-profit, unaccredited school that would be a complete waste of your time and money. It's the worst excuse for a "university" that I've ever seen.

    "University of California, Riverside" is the only real university in Riverside. It's better known as UCR.

    Do not confuse one for the other.

    UCR is one of the least selective campuses in the UC system. It's generally well known to be the last resort for students who insist on trying to get into some UC school but who are unqualified and get rejected from every other UC in the SoCal region. It's the home of the UC rejects.

    That doesn't necessarily mean that it's a terrible school, but it also doesn't mean that it's a very good one. In general, Cal State San Bernardino is a much better school for most undergraduates than UCR. CSUSB is cheaper, bigger, easier to access, has a better student:faculty ratio, has better sports, has better facilities, easier parking, better student apartments, and a lot more graduates in more majors with better success. The other Cal State campuses in driving distance are better in many respects too, such as Cal Poly Pomona and Cal State Fullerton. The CSUs particularly better for engineering, education, health/nursing, most sciences, most technology, and pretty much most undergraduate majors. UCR's best specialties are mostly for graduate studies, particularly agricultural science, that aren't offered at CSU campuses.

    You should first educate yourself about all of the local community colleges and universities by personally visiting each one when they have an open campus visitor's day, so you can get a guided tour. This takes time, effort, and a little bit of money to pay for expenses, but it's really worth it. You really can't get a good feel for the campus without actually seeing it in-person.

    As a general rule, most low and middle income students in Riverside, San Bernardino, and elsewhere nearby should attend a community college and transfer to the best Cal State for their major, then after graduation, go to grad school at the best CSU or UC for their subject. Each campus has its own specializations for research and grad studies.

    For students who qualify for full-ride scholarships or who come from higher income families, the CSU and UC campuses are still good options, but many of the good private universities nearby become more feasible, like the Claremont Colleges, University of Redlands, and Cal Baptist. The cost of the private colleges are usually not affordable enough for low and middle income students unless they get very good scholarships. Pomona College (liberal arts) and Harvey Mudd (sciences, engineering) of the Claremont Colleges are both highly ranked nationally, even ranked above the Ivy League schools in many respects. University of Redlands is also highly regarded and ranked.

    RCC and Moreno Valley are good community colleges to prepare for transfer or to decide on a major, but most community colleges will serve the same purpose just fine if another campus is closer to you. You can't beat them for the value for your money. You can save a lot of money by going to them to get two years worth of general ed and major prerequisites completed. They are also good for career training.

  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    UCR researchers design enviro-friendly self-inking biosensors to help farmers protect their crops, develop new varieties of delicious seedless citrus for California’s agricultural industry, and explore new solutions for better air quality.

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