Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureEtiquette · 6 years ago

Auntie mean when Indians say it?

I always see & hear men from India referring to "Auntie". What does this mean?

8 Answers

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  • 3 years ago

    Meaning Of Aunty

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  • 6 years ago

    Word Aunty is more common in the cities. Often used as a mark of respect for elderly ladies it can sometimes be used in the derogatory sense as well.

    Mostly children and teens use it for the ladies not related to them. So a kid may not use it for his real aunt but refer to his elderly neighborhood lady as Aunty.

    Sometimes it is used as derogatory remark to make fun of someone's age or geeky nature.

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  • 5 years ago

    In India, we people use to say auntie to a woman who is older in age & the most important thing is that woman must be married, only a married woman is said to be auntie in India. the woman who are not married are said to be Didi which means sister in English. Even the woman who are no married don t like to be called as "auntie".

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  • 6 years ago

    I've always thought that in Indian culture, an "Auntie" is a middle-aged female relative or family acquaintance who feels free to comment on any and all aspects of your life. She even gets involved in finding you the "right" potential spouse.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Auntie is the respectful term for older indian women. Related or not every guy/girl or kids refer to older women as auntie.

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  • 6 years ago

    "Auntie" is a term of endearment -- slightly condescending -- for a female who is middle-aged or older. It is not exactly like, but not all that dissimilar from, someone in America calling a woman "Ma'am".

    The Japanese have the same expression. "Obachan" means "aunt", and refers to a a middle-aged or older female. It can be considered quite condescending, similar to saying "Dear" or "Sweetie" in English.

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  • Cara
    Lv 7
    6 years ago

    It's a friendly term of respect used by children and young people for an older woman. I don't see it as patronising, and I don't think it's intended as such - unless from an older person to a still older person, perhaps.

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  • Marcia
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    aunties r pigs

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