Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Pregnancy & ParentingNewborn & Baby · 6 years ago

Can elderly people give whooping cough to infants?

I'm due to have my baby next week and I asked everyone to get a Tdap shot so my baby wouldn't get whooping cough. I know I might be being over protective, but I'd hate him getting sick. My grandma went today to get her Tdap shot and they told her she couldn't get it because she was over 64. I don't want to tell my grandma she can't hold him, especially when she actually tried to get the vaccine. Is there any way she can get some form of shot to protect her from passing on whooping cough?

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    The Tdap shot immunity lasts for up to a year, while if a person becomes immune as a result of having pertussis lasts for about 4 years. 90% of cases are not diagnosed as whooping cough as the whoop doesn't develop and standard treatment for coughs is sufficient.

    Keep your baby away from anyone who's coughing. If your grandma isn't showing any symptoms of having whooping cough, it's likely she doesn't have it. The vast majority of cases of whooping cough in infants happen as a result of it being passed from a parent, and most parents don't realise they have whooping cough.

    If you live in an area where there's been an outbreak, like Washington, take extra precautions while your baby is still an infant, as if an infant gets it it's often more severe and the risks are higher. The majority of people (children, teenagers and adults) who get whooping cough are vaccinated and up-to-date, but they tend to have it far more mildly than those who are not vaccinated, and in California they estimate that unvaccinated people are 8 times more likely to get it than those who are.

    Because you're having your baby next week, it's probably a good thing your grandma couldn't get the shot, as it is likely that the vaccine can cause whooping cough, although that's less likely to happen with the Tdap vaccine rather than the new one.

    If she has a persistant cough or you think she's got a cough that's whooping cough, even if it isn't whooping cough you should keep your baby away from her. Also, to prevent other diseases you should ask her to avoid meat, poultry including eggs and other dangerous foods to avoid more common and deadlier diseases like salmonella, MRSA (very common with 5% of all meat being contaminated), camphlobactor, rotovirus or giardia.

    "The standard U.S. vaccine for whooping cough prevents serious disease in recipients but might allow them to harbor and spread the microbe. A study suggests that recent U.S. outbreaks of whooping cough could have arisen in part from the use of an underachieving vaccine."

    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/whooping-cough...

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  • 3 years ago

    Whooping Cough Elderly

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  • 6 years ago

    Does she have whooping cough?? If she doesn't then I mean I wouldn't tell your own grandma she can't hold your child?? Do you know how much that would upset her? Elderly people already have so much taken from then because of their age why would you do that? I'm also pregnant (31 weeks) and I'd like my parents to get the shot because they will be around the baby the most but I mean you really need to think whooping cough can happen but it doesn't very often. Think before you tell your own grandmother she can't hold your child because of your fear. Just make sure she sanitizes and if she has a cough than to wear a mask?

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  • Lizzy
    Lv 7
    6 years ago

    If she had whooping cough she wouldn't be bar the baby but as she doesn't then there's nothing to stop her holding the baby

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  • Elisha
    Lv 6
    6 years ago

    Yes

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  • 6 years ago
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