Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 7 years ago

Jane eyre home work help?

1.) Who or what inspired the author to write Jane Eyre?

A.

the author's life and her experiences in Victorian England

B.

the author's clergyman father, who encouraged the author's education

C.

the author's two sisters, who died of tuberculosis

D.

two of the author's sisters, whose books were published

2.) From which point of view is Jane Eyre narrated?

A.

fourth-person

B.

first-person

C.

second-person

D.

third-person

3.) Why was the novel Jane Eyre criticized when it was first published?

A.

It influenced other writers, who began to regularly demand the separation of classes.

B.

It made readers want to protest and start boycotts.

C.

Jane's character influenced women in the servant classes of the Victorian era.

D.

Jane's beliefs and actions went against Victorian social standards.

4.) Read what Miss Abbott, Mrs. Reed's maid, says about Jane.

"Yes, if [Jane] were a nice, pretty child, one might compassionate her forlornness; but one really cannot care for such a little toad as that."

What can be inferred about Miss Abbott from what she says?

A.

Miss Abbott dislikes all children.

B.

Miss Abbott has compassion for people who experience misfortune.

C.

Miss Abbott challenges ideas of her time.

D.

Miss Abbott believes that appearances reflect a person's character.

5.) Why does Brontë have Jane narrate this novel?

A.

so readers will learn what the other characters think and feel about Jane

B.

so readers will feel sorry for Jane because of her difficult upbringing and experiences

C.

to tell the story of Jane's experiences from her perspective

D.

to let the reader know everything that happens at Thornfield Manor

6.)Read what Mrs. Fairfax says to Jane in Chapter 24.

"I am sorry to grieve you," pursued the widow; "but you are so young, and so little acquainted with men, I wished to put you on your guard. It is an old saying that 'all is not gold that glitters;' and in this case I do fear there will be something found to be different to what either you or I expect."

What does Mrs. Fairfax's statement foreshadow in the novel?

A.

Mrs. Fairfax's statement foreshadows the revelation that Mr. Rochester is already married.

B.

Mrs. Fairfax's statement foreshadows the loss of Mr. Rochester's wealth.

C.

Mrs. Fairfax's statement foreshadows Jane seeing a strange woman rip her wedding veil.

D.

Mrs. Fairfax's statement foreshadows the destruction of Thornfield Manor by fire.

7.)

Why is Jane's belief that she hears Mr. Rochester calling her name while she's at Moor House the climax of the novel?

A.

It's when the action reaches a critical turning point in the story.

B.

It's when the conflict begins to settle and tension decreases.

C.

It's when the action of the story is building.

D.

It's when a problem arises that the characters try to solve.

Update:

I dont need help with #2 and i will give a BUNCH of points to whoever helps me correctly! I will also vote you best question.

2 Answers

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  • 7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    1. I'd say a) her life and experiences in Victorian England. She did have two sisters that were authors and they died of tuberculosis, but I don't think that has much to do with Jane Eyre.

    2. First person, it's Jane's story

    3. D, women were supposed to be simplistic, but Jane Eyre brought about sensuality and empowerment to women.

    4. E. Miss Abbot is a total biatch. But since that isn't an option, I'd go with D.

    5. C, it's all about the life Jane lives and her journey to Thornfield.

    6. A, all that glitters to Jane is having Mr. Rochester, an realizing that it isn't what she really thought it was is finding out about Bertha.

    7. A, Jane has just been proposed to by St. John Rivers, and has turned her path to Thornfield instead.

  • 5 years ago

    It's a really good. Jane, the protagonist, is a really interesting character. Like the person (however many spaces) before me said, it's just enjoyable being in her head (kind of like the main character from Fyodor Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punishment"). The way she thinks and the decisions she makes... it's not just her being from an entirely different time frame. It's her as an individual, as well. Her circumstances shaped her up to be this specific kind of person, and you just can't help but be intrigued by her. There's romance in it, yes, but it isn't anything fluff. The man she falls in love with (Rochester, I believe?) is an interesting character on his own. You may not like romance, but you'll probably find yourself enraptured by their conversations and the way they move around each other. Believe me when I tell you that Jane Eyre is no Romeo and Juliet. It truly isn't. Romance isn't the most prominent aspect of the story, but it truly spices things up. There are many sides to Jane Eyre. The novel touches topic on religion, abuse, neglect, the paranormal, people, society and class... it truly is a fantastic book. Well, I hope this helped! You should really try reading it. I'm sure, that if you give it a chance, you will get hooked. It's a riveting novel right from the very first pages. =]

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