Mighty asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 7 years ago

How was meat processed during the Gilded Age?

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  • 7 years ago
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    In the early part of the century, they used the most recent immigrants and migrants as strikebreakers in labour actions taken by other workers, also usually immigrants or early descendants. The publication of the Upton Sinclair novel The Jungle in the US in 1906, shocked the public with the poor working conditions and unsanitary practises in meat packing plants in the United States, specifically Chicago. The rooms where the meat would stay had leaky roofs where water dripped onto the meat. The rooms would be dark and filled with rats. The meat sometimes had rat dung on it.

    Meat packing plants, like many industries in the early 20th century, were known to overwork their employees, failed to maintain adequate safety measures, and actively fought unionization. Public pressure to U.S. Congress led to the passage of the Meat Inspection Act and Pure Food and Drug Act, both passed in 1906 on the same day to ensure better regulations of the meat packing industry as well as better treatment of its employees working there.

    Greenhouse, Stephen "Meatpacking Industry Criticized on Human Rights Grounds", The New York Times

    "Blood, Sweat, and Fear" Human Rights Watch

    "The Shame of Postville, Iowa", The New York Times

    http://www.online-literature.com/upton_sinclair/ju...

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  • 7 years ago

    In Slaughterhouses in cities like Chicago near railroads.

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  • tuffy
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    `Slaughter houses and processing plants were extremely dangerous for workers, conditions were not clean, sick animals were processed with healthy ones. There were few federal regulations for slaughtering or processing. "The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair described these conditions.

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  • 7 years ago

    what?

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