AKT
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AKT asked in Politics & GovernmentLaw & Ethics · 7 years ago

Do you support the death penalty?

Or would you like to waste millions of dollars from tax payers each year feeding criminals. A person who committed a crime don't deserve to live. I know that life in person is suck, but they are eating, having friends, playing, have visits from family. But they could have affected the whole family of the person they killed. I know that sometime the system miss up and prosecute the wrong person, but that rarely happens, even if it happens sentence them to jail isn't good either.

If death penalty was enforced in every crime committed, criminals will think a thousand time

before they commit a crime. And that was proven in countries that use the death penalty. What

do you think?

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  • 7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Support.

    The Death Penalty: Justice and Saving Innocent Lives

    Dudley Sharp

    The death penalty has a foundation in justice and it spares more innocent lives.

    Anti death penalty arguments are either false or the pro death penalty arguments are stronger.

    The majority populations of all countries, likely, support the death penalty for some crimes (1).

    Why? Justice.

    THE DEATH PENALTY: SAVING MORE INNOCENT LIVES

    The Innocent Frauds: Standard Anti Death Penalty Strategy

    and

    THE DEATH PENALTY: SAVING MORE INNOCENT LIVES

    http://prodpinnc.blogspot.com/2013/04/the-innocent...

    OF COURSE THE DEATH PENALTY DETERS: A review of the debate

    http://prodpinnc.blogspot.com/2013/03/of-course-de...

    MURDERERS MUCH PREFER LIFE OVER EXECUTION

    99.7% of murderers tell us "Give me life, not execution"

    http://prodpinnc.blogspot.com/2012/11/life-much-pr...

    MORAL FOUNDATIONS FOR THE DEATH PENALTY

    1) Immanuel Kant: "If an offender has committed murder, he must die. In this case, no possible substitute can satisfy justice. For there is no parallel between death and even the most miserable life, so that there is no equality of crime and retribution unless the perpetrator is judicially put to death.". "A society that is not willing to demand a life of somebody who has taken somebody else's life is simply immoral."

    2) Pope Pius XII; "When it is a question of the execution of a man condemned to death it is then reserved to the public power to deprive the condemned of the benefit of life, in expiation of his fault, when already, by his fault, he has dispossessed himself of the right to live." 9/14/52.

    3) John Murray: "Nothing shows the moral bankruptcy of a people or of a generation more than disregard for the sanctity of human life." "... it is this same atrophy of moral fiber that appears in the plea for the abolition of the death penalty." "It is the sanctity of life that validates the death penalty for the crime of murder. It is the sense of this sanctity that constrains the demand for the infliction of this penalty. The deeper our regard for life the firmer will be our hold upon the penal sanction which the violation of that sanctity merit." (Page 122 of Principles of Conduct).

    4) John Locke: "A criminal who, having renounced reason... hath, by the unjust violence and slaughter he hath committed upon one, declared war against all mankind, and therefore may be destroyed as a lion or tyger, one of those wild savage beasts with whom men can have no society nor security." And upon this is grounded the great law of Nature, "Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed." Second Treatise of Civil Government.

    5) Jean-Jacques Rousseau: "In killing the criminal, we destroy not so much a citizen as an enemy. The trial and judgments are proofs that he has broken the Social Contract, and so is no longer a member of the State." (The Social Contract).

    6) Saint (& Pope) Pius V: "The just use of (executions), far from involving the crime of murder, is an act of paramount obedience to this (Fifth) Commandment which prohibits murder." "The Roman Catechism of the Council of Trent" (1566).

    3200 additional pro death penalty quotes

    http://prodpquotes.info/

    REBUTTAL: Common Anti Death Penalty Claims

    1) THE 142 "EXONERATED" FRAUD

    a) The 130 (now 142) death row "innocents" scam

    http://homicidesurvivors.com/2009/03/04/fact-check...

    b) The "Innocent", the "Exonerated" and Death Row

    http://prodpinnc.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-innocent...

    2) Saving Costs with The Death Penalty

    http://prodpinnc.blogspot.com/2013/02/death-penalt...

    3) RACE & THE DEATH PENALTY: A REBUTTAL TO THE RACISM CLAIMS

    http://prodpinnc.blogspot.com/2012/07/rebuttal-dea...

    4) "The Death Penalty: Neither Hatred nor Revenge"

    http://homicidesurvivors.com/2009/07/20/the-death-...

    Source(s): . 5) The Death Penalty: Mercy, Expiation, Redemption & Salvation http://prodpinnc.blogspot.com/2013/06/the-death-pe... 6) "Killing Equals Killing: The Amoral Confusion of Death Penalty Opponents" http://homicidesurvivors.com/2013/02/19/murder-and... 7) "The Death Penalty: Not a Human Rights Violation" http://homicidesurvivors.com/2006/03/20/the-death-... ------ 1) US Death Penalty Support at 80%; World Support Remains High and 95% of murder victim's families support death penalty from Murder Victims' Families for Death Penalty Repeal: More Hurt For Victims: http://prodpinnc.blogspot.com/2012/04/victims-fami... Much more, upon request. sharpjfa@aol.com
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  • 7 years ago

    In some cases it is necessary, if a criminal is a mass murderer and cannot be rehabilitated into society without harming someone than yes the death penalty is needed. However if someone is a drug offender or a thief who can or has the potential to be a productive member of society they do not deserve the death penalty. There has been some talk on how the death penalty hinders criminals, if someone commits a crime in a country where there are no harsh punishments (ie the death penalty) it is said that they are more likely to re-offend, where as in societies where there are death penalties and harsh punishments there are lower crime rates and they are (arguably) more productive citizens. This is just a generalisation though. You are sort of implying that everyone should get the death penalty, speeding is a crime so should someone who speeds be executed?? It is also shown that Death penalties are more expensive for a society than normal petty crimes.

    Source(s): I wrote a historical essay on crime and punishment and received the top grade.
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  • 7 years ago

    Sorry, I don't agree.

    You mentioned costs, risks and criminals deciding not to commit a crime. Here's a few interesting facts:

    The death penalty costs much more than life in prison. Study after study has found that the death penalty is much more expensive than life in prison. Since the stakes are so high, the process is far more complex than for any other kind of criminal case. The largest costs come at the pre-trial and trial stages. The tremendous expenses in a death penalty case apply whether or not the defendant is convicted, let alone sentenced to death.

    Examples- trial costs (death penalty and non death penalty cases, California):

    People v. Scott Peterson, Death Penalty Trial

    $3.2 Million Total

    People v. Rex Allen Krebs Death Penalty Trial

    $2.8 Million Total

    People v. Cary Stayner, Death Penalty Trial

    $2.368 Million Total

    People v. Robert Wigley, Non-Death Penalty Trial

    $454,000 Total

    This data is for cases where the best records have been kept.

    You also mentioned keeping criminals from committing crimes.

    Most criminals don't think about consequences at all (let alone a thousand times.) Homicide rates for states that use the death penalty are consistently higher than for those that don’t. The most recent FBI data confirms this. For people without a conscience, fear of being caught is the best deterrent. The death penalty is no more effective in deterring others than life sentences.

    The system can make tragic mistakes. As of now, 142 wrongly convicted people on death row have been exonerated. We’ll never know for sure how many people have been executed for crimes they didn’t commit. DNA is rarely available in homicides, often irrelevant and can’t guarantee we won’t execute innocent people.

    Source(s): http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/murder-rates-natio... for state by state homicide rates from the FBI (alphabetically) showing which states have the death penalty http://www.innocenceproject.org http://deathpenaltyinfo.org/costs-death-penalty
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  • 7 years ago

    I disagree with the death penalty. I agree with Susan. It cost more to put someone to death then life in prison. The murderers and rapists should be prison terms all others should be sentenced in alternative ways. The states with the death penalty have higher murder rates so obviously that's not a deterrent

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    The death penalty should only be used for extremely serious crimes (mass murder, war crimes, genocide). A simple case of drug trafficking should not be a capital offense

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  • 7 years ago

    Certain crimes with absolute proof do justify the death sentence - war crimes.

    Without absolute proof the death sentence is wrong.

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Having been to Prison and seeing what has been kept alive "YES" I support the Death Penalty they are Oxygen Thieves and most will Reoffend.

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Yes. For simple parking infractions. I'm not no RINO

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  • Yes i do, they get what they deserve with sufficient supportive evidence.

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