Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentGovernment · 6 years ago

What was the turning point of Civil Rights when the Black Community turned from Republican to Democrat?

The Southern Manifesto in 1956 was a document written in February and March 1956, in the United States Congress, in opposition to racial integration of public places.[1] The manifesto was signed by 99 politicians (97 Democrats) from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.

The Congressmen drafted the document to counter the landmark Supreme Court 1954 ruling Brown v. Board of Education, which determined that segregation of public schools was unconstitutional.

All of the signatories were Southern Democrats except two Republicans, Joel Broyhill and Richard Poff of Virginia.

School segregation laws were some of the most enduring and best-known of the Jim Crow laws that characterized the American South and several northern states at the time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Manifesto

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  • 6 years ago
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    You know, that is a very good question.. that I'd really like to know the exact answer to myself. Most black people today call republican's racist ignorant to the fact that democrats where the ones who supported slavery. Now, I'm a republican myself, but I'm very well educated and prepared to answer any questions anyone has about why I choose to affiliate myself with my party, but I would also like to know why other people call my party racist.

    Getting back to your question, if I had to guess, and it would only be a guess. I would have to say in more recent times than after the civil war. By more recent, I mean the mid 1940's.

    I know my response/guess doesn't answer your question exactly, but I did in fact find your question interesting!

    Source(s): Most people say growing up in the south and mixed(mom is white and my father is black) is a disadvantage, but I get to learn about all cultures and walks of life, and I get to say what I want without people calling me racist. Truly, it is a blessing that I do not have to be politically correct all the time.
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  • 6 years ago

    Lyndon B. Johnson, July 1964, Civil Rights Act.

    Prior to Johnson, John F. Kennedy did a number of things that demonstrated his support for civil rights, including: showing personal concern for the jailing of Martin Luther King during the 1960 campaign, providing federal marshals to protect Freedom Riders, and pushing the Interstate Commerce Commission to desegregate interstate travel. JFK started the ball rolling on the Civil Rights Act, but LBJ used his connections in Congress to get it passed.

    After the 1964 Civil Rights Act, racist southerners began to leave the democratic party, and blacks began to join the democratic party.

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  • 6 years ago

    While Johnson was president, only 9% of the public schools were integrated. Nixon did most of it. Eisenhower sent the National Guard to allow black students into the schools safely.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    I'd say the 1930s.

    You're outlining when they gained southern whites, rather than when they lost ground on civil rights.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    You tell us you seem to have the info already it seems.

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