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Why are my fasting blood sugar levels higher than non fasting?

When I've had glucose checked non- fasting they're always lower than the fasting glucose le els in the morning. Non fasting in PM usually 96-100; fasting 110-120 in AM. Why and is this pre diabetic?

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  • 7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    When you eat, your body produces hormones (like insulin) that reduce your blood sugar by taking it into muscle cells and storing it as glycogen and fat in the liver and extremities. When you fast, your body produces other hormones (like glucagon) that increase your blood sugar by manufacturing it and releasing it from glycogen and fat storage. Because your levels are sometime higher than normal, but not always, you are falling under the "pre-diabetes" umbrella. Most clinicians consider pre-diabetes as a syndrome that usually also includes high blood pressure and some degree of obesity or being overweight. People who are very overweight can often reduce the BP and possibly reverse the pre-diabetes by losing the extra pounds.

    Source(s): pharmacist
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  • 5 years ago

    I had a bit of a barny with a doctor some time ago about this and with others in general about some things Diabetics are not told. I'd done a medical and my fasting sugar was high, down on where it had been in the months preceeding but high none the less. He went off the deep end and the word uncontrolled was used a lot. I was way overweight at the time, try losing weight with Type II on a western diet. I asked what the HBA1C level was and he ranted about uncontrolled then admitted he did not have that result yet. When that did come back I was a little above normal but well below where I usually am and he had to apologise for his previous rant. Since then I've found more things out. I am rarely a breakfast eater - wrong, eat breakfast. My last meal at night is often around 6pm which can mean I am fasted for 14 to 16 hours pre fasting test - wrong, if you have a test coming do not fast more than 10 hours tops or you body starts dumping glucose in to your system to compensate. A plasma insulin test and sometimes beta cell test, which the doctors do not often ask for, will help clear this up. I also started taking 6 year old, heaven grade, Korean Red Ginseng capsules and eating a Thai diet much more rice and white meat than western potatoes and red meat. I started walking everywhere (Thais think I'm nuts) and my weight plummeted. Eleotin, tea, also worked very very well especially taken with coconut oil. Then, still not 100% up on it, I found out about ISF and some of the triggers. Eating Lychees, not a favourite of mine, is one trigger. ISF is a chemical released by the Liver that is more powerful than Insulin. Why doctors insist on pumping up insulin levels when one is resistant is beyond me all it does is increase resistance and cuts HGH production which leaves a diabetic open to secondary infections. If you are diagnosed as Diabetic, especially Type II do some research do not swallow everything your doctor tells you. Some will tell you to take Chrome - stops peaking and troughing but did not much else for me, Vanadium cut sugar and cholesterol but can be hard to get. For the first six months test a lot. Especially after meals and exercise. For example I found, when in the UK, certain types of potatoes or how they were cooked, punched me way up where others did not. Eat breakfast too.

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  • 4 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Secret To Destroy Diabetes : http://DiabetesCure.raiwi.com/?ckwP
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  • 4 years ago

    2

    Source(s): My Diabetes Gone Completely - http://DiabetesGoFar.com/?ZMHm
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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Why are my fasting blood sugar levels higher than non fasting?

    When I've had glucose checked non- fasting they're always lower than the fasting glucose le els in the morning. Non fasting in PM usually 96-100; fasting 110-120 in AM. Why and is this pre diabetic?

    Source(s): fasting blood sugar levels higher fasting: https://tinyurl.im/97nZB
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  • 7 years ago

    Fasting levels in the morning are frequently somewhat higher than non-fasting levels. The body has not produced insulin in response to food, so glucose goes up sometimes. One of the things that happens to the body when we wake up is to increase glucose slightly. I doubt that a doctor would regard these particular glucose levels as indicating pre-diabetic on their own. If a doctor is aware of other symptoms and factors, then they might say pre-diabetic. In the last few years the criteria for what constitutes pre-diabetic has changed.

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  • 7 years ago

    You have impaired fasting glucose (IFG) levels, my friend, which DO put you in the realms of pre-diabetes. It MUST, by law, be a practising medical doctor that makes the diagnosis, however.

    The 'normal' fasting (after not eating overnight) blood sugar (glucose) level for a non-diabetic would be in the range 70 to 99 mg/dL (3.9 to 5.5 mmol/l for people who use the International Standard for blood glucose measurement).

    Two hours post prandial (after eating) a non-diabetic's blood glucose level would not normally rise above 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/l). I say normally as there are occasions when it could go higher, such as if the person being tested had an underlying infection at the time of testing; the person being tested was undergoing a period of extreme stress at the time of testing; or the person being tested was taking certain types of medication which are known to cause a rise in blood glucose levels. (These medications often include steroids, such as the types prescribed for the treatment of asthma, or for treating certain specific types of infection.)

    Edit:

    I forgot to say that your doctor would NOT diagnose you based on one blood glucose test. You would need to have raised blood glucose levels over several times/regularly before s/he would even consider diagnosing you as pre-diabetic, and s/he would, in all likelihood, require you to undergo further testing.

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  • Alisa
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    It's really difficult to say without knowing what you ate and when you ate before the test. Most doctors will say that anything below 140 1-2 hours after eating is normal and that non-diabetics should return to pre-meal/fasting levels (<100 mg/dL) by 2-4 hours. Most non-diabetics probably won't ever go as high as 140 mg/dL (that's really the upper limit of "normal," pushing "not normal") and most will be <100 by around two hours, give or take, and depending on what was consumed. To give you an idea, I tested a non-diabetic friend of mine after he ate four huge pieces of deep-dish pizza. Lots of bread, lots of sugary tomato sauce - just very high in carbohydrates, well over 150 grams. I tested him at 1.5 hours on my meter and his blood sugar was 73. Now, clearly he's not diabetic, but doctors have a very large range of what is considered non-diabetic. So, what's normal: <100 in two hours or <140 within four hours? Honestly, I'd err on the side of caution. That number certainly isn't dangerous, but if that was taken 3+ hours after eating, then the test may have caught something very, very early. If you have other risk factors for diabetes, like obesity, age, a high-carbohydrate diet, high triglycerides or high blood pressure, then request a fasting blood sugar test and an A1c, which is a 3-month average of your blood sugar.

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  • Joy
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

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  • Kai
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Mine too. I know my fasting numbers are normally above 100 because I do not eat real soon after waking so, since I'm up and doing things, my body has to kick out stored glucose, lots of it because my body figures I'm never going to eat anything. If I ate rather reasonably soon after waking, my numbers wouldn't be so high. But I also take a thyroid pill first thing and I'm not supposed to eat for an hour after taking (and my doctor would like me to take an osteoporosis pill which would mean taking it prior to the thyroid pill since it HAS to be on an empty stomach and you can't eat for at least an hour, then I'd have to take my thyroid (which technically is supposed to be taken on an empty stomach too) and wait another hour. And by then 2 hours of my life have gone by and I've gotten no eating in yet. And I'm the type of person who, if I do not immediately get washed, dressed and out the door as quickly as possible after waking, I can talk myself into not doing ANYTHING all day except play computer games--so I'm usually out the door like a shot whether I've eaten anything or not within 2 hours after waking. I've never been a big morning eater so forcing myself to eat is difficult (and, boy, can I think of a million things that have to be done instead of eating that first meal). My post-prandial numbers are always normal, but I assume that's because I'm more active during the rest of my day, and usually I'm eating (very slowly) low carb stuff, so my glucose is being handled ok by my body. That's why, although the A1C test gives you an overall average level of what your blood glucose has been for the past 90 days, it doesn't tell you when your body isn't working quite up to par--which is why a newly diagnosed diabetic ought to be testing him/herself at least 7 times daily (also just to get the practice of poking oneself) and keeping a record of it so you can see when you have the most glucose trouble. I don't think there's much I can do about my fasting blood glucose, it's not real high but it is usually above normal which is why I'm diabetic. And it has gone higher when I'm under stress or haven't gotten much sleep (usually because I'm stressed out).

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