Is it strange for someone with High-Functioning Autism to be completely mute?

Everything i've read says that the Low-Functioning form is associated with muteness not High-Functioning

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  • 7 years ago
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    People with autism all have the same issues, whether low functioning or high functioning, which are communication deficits, language impairments, social functioning deficits and sensory integration deficits. The degree to which they interfere with a person's life is usually the difference between high and low functioning. However, the delays are not across the board and some with HFA can talk as glibly as you or I, but the content of the exchange is aberrant.

    However, because people are different; there are at times co-morbid features that make it hard for some HFA folks to be unable to speak. These can can be extreme shyness or fear of social interactions, which may cause selective mutism, an underlying speech issue that makes pronouncing words very difficult and also language processing delays. This issue had much do to with language processing or the ability to understand what is said, process it and then formulate an answer that makes sense and manage to say it. Even children without autism who have these problems do not talk much.

    My suggestion is that you read a couple of books that will help you understand autism better. Dr. Temple Grandin has written two fascinating books, "Thinking in Pictures" and "Animals in Translation," among others. She has HFA and tells about her early life in the first book, "Emergence, Labeled Autistic." She is a wonderful writer, genius and tells the story as she experienced it. Jody Picoult also wrote a fiction book called, "House Rules," which is very well researched and takes a look at what life is like for a HFA teenager.

    Source(s): Special Educator
  • 7 years ago

    No there are many incredibly intelligent people on the autism spectrum who for reasons we don't understand have difficulty communicating verbally. Many of these individuals use communication devices or sign language to communicate. Often it takes years because of their lack of verbal communication for others to recognize their intelligence. You can read about one girls story here:

    http://www.nationalautismresourcesblog.com/2012/04...

  • 7 years ago

    Nope, not in my book.

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