Brady asked in SportsFootball (American) · 6 years ago

NFL Contract questions?

In the NFL, how can a player be traded or released before there contract is dead? Like for example, a player gets signed for 6 years but gets traded or released before the 6 years is up. Doesen't that defeat the purpose of a contract? How is that allowed?

4 Answers

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  • Sean M
    Lv 7
    6 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    If a player is traded or released, the contract is still valid, in the case of a trade, the acquiring team takes on the original team's contract obligations, it's very common for players to be traded when the team they are with is trying to get under the Salary Cap.

    When a player is released, they still owe the player any Guaranteed money remaining under their contract, UNLESS they are signed by another team, in which case, the amount left on the contract, is subtracted from how ever much their new teams signs them for, this is called "Offset Language" & is written into many NFL contracts

  • It does not defeat the purpose of the contract because the contract does not change.

    In every contract, there is a specified amount of guaranteed money. When someone is released, they still earn what their contract says they are entitled to.

    When a player is traded, the contract is just picked up by a different team. It does not change the terms.

  • Hawk M
    Lv 7
    6 years ago

    It all depends on the contract. Everything is negotiable.

    If the player has a "no trade" clause, they can't trade him unless he agrees.Some contracts have "guaranteed money". If he gets dropped, they still have to the guaranteed money, which could be any amount. The better the player, the stronger his position, the better terms he can get come contract time. If those 6 years are guaranteed, he still collects. Like I said, Everything is negotiable.

  • 6 years ago

    It doesn't effect anything. NFL teams just don't do a lot of trading like the NBA does that's all. They want to build a team around certain players.

    Source(s): Answer my question.
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