Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 6 years ago

When 'christians' talk of scientists of olden times as 'christians', do they?

not understand that at the time those people lived, not being 'christian' was going to get one burned at the stake?

BQ: What percentage of today's scientists (especially those in the 'hard' sciences) are 'christian'? Less than 5%.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Those that were burned at the stake, this is just by the Roman Catholic Church... There were more with the Coe

    Ramihrdus of Cambrai (1076 or 1077) (lynched)

    Peter of Bruys († 1130) (lynched)

    Gerard Segarelli († 1300)

    Maifreda da Pirovano († 1300)

    Andrea Saramiti († 1300)

    Fra Dolcino († 1307) (never tried by Catholic Church), Italy

    Sister Margherita († 1307), Italy

    Brother Longino († 1307), Italy

    Marguerite Porete († 1310)

    Botulf Botulfsson († 1311), the only known heretic executed in Sweden

    Jacques de Molay (1243–1314), burned after conviction by a tribunal under the control of King Philip IV of France, France

    Geoffroi de Charney († 1314), burned with Jacques de Molay above, France.

    Guilhèm Belibasta († 1321), last Cathar

    Francesco da Pistoia († 1337)

    Lorenzo Gherardi († 1337)

    Bartolomeo Greco († 1337)

    Bartolomeo da Bucciano († 1337)

    Antonio Bevilacqua († 1337)

    William Sawtre († 1401)

    John Badby († 1410)

    Jan Hus (1371–1415), impenitent/unrepentant heretic

    Jerome of Prague (1365–1416), relapsed heretic

    Joan of Arc at the stake, 1431

    St. Joan of Arc (1412–1431), relapsed heretic, Rouen, France

    Thomas Bagley († 1431)

    Pavel Kravař († 1433)

    Girolamo Savonarola († 1498)

    Joshua Weißöck (1488–1498)

    Jean Vallière († 1523)

    Hendrik Voes († 1523), 1st martyr in the Seventeen Provinces

    Jan van Essen († 1523), 1st martyr in the Seventeen Provinces

    Jan de Bakker († 1525), 1st martyr in the Northern Netherlands

    Wendelmoet Claesdochter († 1527), 1st Dutch woman burned as heretic

    Michael Sattler († 1527)

    Patrick Hamilton († 1528), St Andrews, Scotland

    Balthasar Hubmaier (1485–1528), relapsed heretic

    George Blaurock (1491–1529)

    Hans Langegger († 1529)

    Giovanni Milanese († 1530)

    Richard Bayfield († 1531)

    James Bainham († 1532)

    John Frith (1503–1533), England

    William Tyndale (1490–1536)

    Jakob Hutter († 1536)

    Aefgen Listincx (d. 1538)

    Anneke Esaiasdochter (d. 1539)

    Francisco de San Roman († 1540)

    Robert Barnes († 1540), England

    Thomas Gerrard († 1540), England

    Giandomenico dell' Aquila († 1542)

    Maria van Beckum (d. 1544)

    Ursula van Beckum (d. 1544)

    George Wishart (1513–1546), St Andrews, Scotland

    Rogers' execution at Smithfield, 1555

    John Rogers († 1555), London, England

    Canterbury Martyrs († 1555), England

    Laurence Saunders, (1519–1555), England

    Rowland Taylor († 1555), England

    John Hooper († 1555), England

    Robert Ferrar († 1555), Carmarthen, Wales

    Patrick Pakingham († 1555), Uxbridge, England

    Hugh Latimer (1485–1555), relapsed heretic, England

    Nicholas Ridley (1500–1555), England

    Bartolomeo Hector († 1555)

    Paolo Rappi († 1555)

    Vernon Giovanni († 1555)

    Labori Antonio († 1555)

    John Bradford († 1555), London, England

    Thomas Cranmer (1489–1556), relapsed heretic, England

    Stratford Martyrs († 1556), 11 men and 2 women, London, England

    Joan Waste (d. 1556), Derby, England

    Pomponio Angerio († 1556)

    Nicola Sartonio († 1557)

    Thomas von Imbroich († 1558) (beheaded)

    Fra Goffredo Varaglia († 1558)

    Gisberto di Milanuccio († 1558)

    Francesco Cartone († 1558)

    Antonio di Colella († 1559)

    Antonio Gesualdi († 1559)

    Giacomo Bonello († 1560)

    Mermetto Savoiardo († 1560)

    Dionigi di Cola († 1560)

    Gian Pascali di Cuneo († 1560)

    Bernardino Conte († 1560)

    Giorgio Olivetto († 1567)

    Luca di Faenza († 1568)

    Thomas Szük (1522–1568)

    Bartolomeo Bartoccio († 1569)

    Dirk Willems († 1569), Netherlands

    Fra Arnaldo di Santo Zeno († 1570)

    Alessandro di Giacomo († 1574)

    Benedetto Thomaria († 1574)

    Diego Lopez († 1583)

    Gabriello Henriquez († 1583)

    Borro of Arezzo († 1583)

    Ludovico Moro († 1583)

    Pietro Benato († 1585)

    Francesco Gambonelli († 1594)

    Marcantonio Valena († 1594)

    Giovanni Antonio da Verona († 1599)

    Fra Celestino († 1599)

    Giordano Bruno (1548–1600), Rome, Italy

    Maurizio Rinaldi († 1600)

    Bartolomeo Coppino († 1601)

    Edward Wightman († 1612), last person burned for heresy in England.

    Malin Matsdotter (1613–1676), for witchcraft, Sweden

    Kimpa Vita (1684–1706), Angola

    Maria Barbara Carillo (1625–1721), Madrid, Spain

    Source(s): Wiki
  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    "not understand that at the time those people lived, not being 'christian' was going to get one burned at the stake?"

    Michael Faraday, John Dalton, Joseph Priestly?

    Don't think so. The last execution for heresy in Britain was at the end of the seventeenth century.

    And you should stop making up your own statistics. You stand a good chance of being found out:

    http://ncse.com/rncse/18/2/do-scientists-really-re...

  • 6 years ago

    http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/intersection/201...

    In the course of her research, Ecklund surveyed nearly 1,700 scientists and interviewed 275 of them. She finds that most of what we believe about the faith lives of elite scientists is wrong. Nearly 50 percent of them are religious. Many others are what she calls “spiritual entrepreneurs,” seeking creative ways to work with the tensions between science and faith outside the constraints of traditional religion…..only a small minority are actively hostile to religion

    Incidentally, the universities whose scientists were surveyed for the book are: Columbia, Cornell, Duke, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, MIT, Princeton, Stanford, Penn, U.C. Berkeley, UCLA, U. of Chicago, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, U. Michigan, U. Minnesota, UNC Chapel Hill, U. Washington-Seattle, U. Wisconsin-Madison, U.S.C., Washington University, and Yale.

  • anon
    Lv 7
    6 years ago

    these were not burned at the stake

    Leonardo da Vince (1452–1519) .....Experimental science;

    physics

    Francis Bacon (1561–1626) ............Scientic method

    Johann Kepler (1571–1630) ...........Scientic astronomy

    William Petty (1623–1687) ............Statistics; scientic

    economics

    Blaise Pascal (1623–1662) ..............Hydrostatics; barometer

    Robert Boyle (1627–1691) .............Chemistry; gas dynamics

    John Ray (1627–1705) ....................Natural history

    Nicolas Steno (1631–1686 ..............Stratigraphy

    Isaac Newton (1642–1727) .............Dynamics; calculus;

    gravitation law; reflecting

    telescope

    William Derham (1657–1735) .......Ecology

    John Woodward (1665–1728) ........Paleontology

    Carolus Linneaus (1707–1778) ......Taxonomy; biological

    classication system

    Richard Kirwan (1733–1812) ........Mineralogy

    William Herschel (1738–1822) ......Galactic astronomy;

    Uranus

    John Dalton (1766–1844) ...............Atomic theory; gas law

    Georges Cuvier (1769–1832) .........Comparative anatomy

    Humphrey Davy (1778–1829) .......ermokinetics; safety

    lamp

    John Kidd, M.D. (1775–1851) .......Chemical synthetics

    David Brewster (1781–1868) .........Optical mineralogy;

    kaleidoscope

    William Prout (1785–1850) ...........Food chemistry

    Michael Faraday (1791–1867) .......Electromagnetics; eld

    theory; generator

    Charles Babbage (1792–1871) .......Operations research;

    computer science;

    opthalmoscope

    Samuel F.B. Morse (1791–1872) .....Telegraph

    William Whewell (1794–1866) ......Anemometer

    Joseph Henry (1797–1878) ............Electric motor;

    galvanometer

    Matthew Maury (1806–1873) .......Oceanography; hydrography

    Louis Agassiz (1807–1873) .............Glaciology; ichthyology

    James Simpson (1811–1870) ..........Gynecology; anesthesiology

    James Joule (1818–1889) ................ermodynamics

    George Stokes (1819–1903)............Fluid mechanics

    Rudolph Virchow (1821–1902) .....Pathologyy

    Louis Pasteur (1822–1884) .............Bacteriology; biochemistry;

    sterilization; immunization

    Gregor Mendel (1822–1884) ..........Genetics

    Henri Fabre (1823–1915) ...............Entomology of

    living insects

    William Thompson, ........................Energetics; absolute

    Lord Kelvin (1824–1907) temperatures;

    Atlantic cable

    William Huggins (1824–1910) ......Astral spectrometry

    Bernhard Riemann (1826–1866) ....Non-Euclidean geometrics

    Joseph Lister (1827–1912) ..............Antiseptic surgery

    Balfour Stewart (1828–1887) .........Ionospheric electricity

    Joseph Clerk Maxwell .....................Electrodynamics; statistical

    (1831–1879) thermodynamics

    P. G. Tait (1831–1901) .....................Vector analysis

    John Strutt, Lord Rayleigh ..............Similitude; model analysis;

    (1842–1919) inert gases

    John Ambrose Fleming ...................Electronics; electron tube;

    (1849–1945) thermionic valve

    William Ramsay (1852–1916) .......Isotopic chemistry,

    element transmutation

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  • 6 years ago

    Those less than 5% are the only ones that tell the truth. The rest tell lies just like they did when they were in college.

  • 6 years ago

    thats a misguided half truth. but i wouldnt expect more than that from the internet lol especially yahoo.

    as for your BQ, complete guess on your part. lol again, not worth putting any stock in.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    So what the **** does that mean stop trying to prove Christians wrong you sick bastard

  • 6 years ago

    Oh appealing to the majority that isn't logical fallacy AT ALL you brilliant thing you

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    No, they don't. :D

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