Christians why does God punish entire races and genders?

Just seems odd generations of people must pay for the action of a person they don't know, just does not register for me.

Update:

As much as we like to be there is only the human race, history proves different, heck the bible itself proves that not to be true.

Update 2:

@Pancho example: punishing all women to have the second pain to death in childbirth because of eve, placing a curse of darkness in the ham and sham story.

11 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    We are given Free Will by God. God is not punishing, He is just letting our humanity play out. As it plays out, many others see the pain and that builds their Soul, which is what God is trying to do; build strong and good Souls for His needs.

  • 7 years ago

    as for races, Noach cursed the children of Ham because of the ritual evil that was done to him and his wife.

    he said they would be slaves of slaves.

    as for moses being commanded not to allow men with "flat noses" near unto the alter, he also said they could not come for "ten generations"..

    A father King, said once to his son, do not take a wife from these tribes and people. even the jews of jesus generation had no dealings with the people of the woman at the well, even though the woman said that Abraham was their father. and yet an entire village became a convert because of that woman. and her conversation with jesus.

    the curse of Adam and Eve has been done away in jesus. according to LDS theology and doctrine. the Curse of devil worshipers will never be put away. and it does not matter, white or black, if a person worships the devil they will not be saved by jesus. the sons of perdition are curse to go into outer darkness. as far as i understand this is the only curse that still exists.

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    It's because God's ways are beyond your understanding...when you have an argument with someone you love, such as a spouse, it's painful, but when you make up, it results in a deeper, more loving relationship than if the pain and suffering had never happened...think of this on a cosmic, eternal scale to catch a glimpse of how we worry about "tiny" things...Truth is revealed in Paradox (not contradiction, as some claim) but Paradox...Kierkegaard explains it quite well in Fear and Trembling and A Sickness Unto Death, but I doubt you will put forth the effort to read the enlightened philosopher.

  • Pancho
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Why have you naively assumed that God is "punishing" people? Where did you get that idea? ... There is nothing at all to support it ... And why would you assume that God would punish someone for the actions of another?? What have you been doing? Hanging out with Christians? Yes? Then stop that! ...

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  • Moi
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    your contention seems to be with Adam and the curse he brought upon mankind

    we are not "punished by God" for Adam's sin - and God says so

    but we are affected by its consequences and we must find a way to deal with it -- in and through Jesus Christ

    simple comparison:

    say that your dad is a deadbeat alcoholic - God does not hold YOU personally accountable for his sin, but YOU will surely be affected by it and must find ways of dealing with it

    Eze 18:20 The soul that sinneth, it shall die. The son shall not bear the iniquity of the father, neither shall the father bear the iniquity of the son: the righteousness of the righteous shall be upon him, and the wickedness of the wicked shall be upon him.

  • ?
    Lv 6
    7 years ago

    Well the Bible does say that God is no respecter of man (individuals), and as the Constitution claims, all men are created equal.

  • Achmed
    Lv 5
    7 years ago

    God doesn't, he punishes people by their actions. Sometimes (which you may be talking about) to the 2nd and 3rd generations. This is representative of the actions of the person. Meaning they do it to themselves.

  • CB
    Lv 6
    7 years ago

    (Exodus 20:5, 6) You must not bow down to them nor be induced to serve them, because I God your God am a God exacting exclusive devotion, bringing punishment for the error of fathers upon sons, upon the third generation and upon the fourth generation, in the case of those who hate me; but exercising loving-kindness toward the thousandth generation in the case of those who love me and keep my commandments. Exodus 20:5, which says that God brings punishment for the error of fathers upon sons? This acknowledges the reality that a person’s error may have consequences affecting his descendants. This principle is illustrated in the case of a Levite named Korah. During Israel’s wilderness journey, Korah became dissatisfied with his service privileges. In an effort to secure priestly duties for himself, Korah and some others rebelled against God’s representatives, Moses and Aaron. For presumptuously reaching out for this office—a privilege they were not entitled to—God put Korah and his rebel forces to death. (Num. 16:8-11, 31-33) Korah’s sons, however, did not join in the rebellion. God did not hold them accountable for their father’s sin. Their loyalty to God resulted in their own lives being spared.—Num. 26:10, 11. But what about the warning at Exodus 20:5, part of the Ten Commandments? Again, consider the context. God inaugurated the Law covenant with the nation of Israel. After hearing the terms of the covenant, the Israelites declared publicly: All that God has spoken we are willing to do. (Ex. 19:5-8) The nation as a whole thus entered into a special relationship with God. So the words at Exodus 20:5 were fundamentally directed to the whole nation. When the Israelites remained faithful to God the nation benefited and enjoyed many blessings. (Lev. 26:3-8) The opposite also held true. When the nation of Israel rejected God and went after false gods, he withdrew his blessing and protection; the nation suffered calamity. (Judg. 2:11-18) Granted, there were some who maintained their integrity and kept God’s commandments despite the nation’s idolatrous course. (1 Ki. 19:14, 18) Faithful ones likely experienced some hardship because of the nation’s sins, but God expressed loving-kindness toward them. God’s Word also contains accounts where individual families were affected by parental misconduct. High Priest Eli offended God by allowing his good-for-nothing, immoral sons to remain as priests. (1 Sam. 2:12-16, 22-25) Because Eli honored his sons more than God decreed that Eli’s family would be cut off from the high priesthood, which happened starting with his great-great-grandson, Abiathar. (1 Sam. 2:29-36; 1 Ki. 2:27) The principle of Exodus 20:5 is illustrated by the example of Gehazi as well. He abused his position as Elisha’s attendant in order to benefit materially from the curing of Syrian General Naaman. Through Elisha, God pronounced judgment, saying: The leprosy of Naaman will stick to you and your offspring to time indefinite. (2 Ki. 5:20-27) So Gehazi’s descendants were affected by the consequences of his wrongdoing.

    As Creator and Life-Giver,God has every right to determine what punishment is just and appropriate. The above instances show that children or descendants may feel the ill effects of their ancestors sin. However, God hears the outcry of the afflicted ones, and individuals who earnestly turn to him may receive his favor and even some measure of relief.—Job 34:28. Very young children who have not reached the age of responsibility are almost altogether the product of their parents through inheritance, with, additionally, the training and environment provided by the parents. Accordingly, God holds the parents responsible until the child reaches the age of responsibility for his own decisions and acts. What the parents do as to their relationship with God therefore affects the entire family. Just as the law of men calls the parents to account for the acts of their minor children, so does God. If a child commits a crime, damaging property, the father can expect the police to be knocking on his door to bring charges against him and require that he pay for the damage. Why then should not God likewise hold parents responsible for the acts of their young children?

    Source(s): JW.org
  • 7 years ago

    Oh, how the heathen rage and imagine silly things. Clouds they are without water, carried about of winds; trees whose fruit withereth, without fruit, twice dead, plucked up by the roots.

  • ?
    Lv 4
    7 years ago

    Because he is a vengeful and jealous god that talks about spreading love

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