what does jesuit identity mean?

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  • 7 years ago
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    Jesuits (also known in English as 'the Society of Jesus') are a religious order that are part of the Roman Catholic Church. The order was founded by a Roman Catholic Spaniard in the 16th century. It includes both clergy (monks/priests/nuns) and lay people. Jesuits place a high value on education and they founded many universities (e.g. Gonzaga, Loyola Marymount, St Joseph's, Georgetown, Boston College, Fordham, and many others in the US). They are not limited to the US, there are many Jesuit schools around the world (I'm American, so I'm only familiar with the US universities).

    They are known for high quality education. I believe that they are the largest religious order in the Roman Catholic Church. Other Roman Catholic religious orders include Franciscans, Dominicans, Augustinians, etc.

    Jesuits are the most "free thinking" of the Roman Catholic orders. They don't accept the Vatican's word on everything and are known for questioning the Vatican's directives.

    Jesuits embrace rather than reject science, and have made significant contributions to Geology (among other sciences). They are also known for their devotion to public service.

    To me, Jesuits represent liberal Roman Catholics. The first thing that comes to mind when I hear the word Jesuit is education. They standout from all other Roman Catholic orders in that respect.

    So if one has a "Jesuit identity," it means that they follow the principles I've listed above. It does not mean that they are ordained ministers. Any Roman Catholic can have a Jesuit identity.

    I will include in the sources box a link to the Wikipedia entry for Jesuit and also a link to the Jesuit website itself in case you'd like to do further reading on this subject.

    Source(s): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_of_Jesus http://www.jesuit.org/ From the Catholic Encyclopedia: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14081a.htm From St Joseph's University in Philadelpia defining Jesuit identity: http://www.sju.edu/jesuit-identity
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