MLB to expand instant replay next season. Agree or disagree? More inside ->?

NEW YORK (AP) -- Major League Baseball says it is moving ahead with plans to expand instant replay for umpires' calls next year.

MLB Executive Vice President Joe Torre says ''we're pretty confident we'll have it in place for 2014.''

Video review has been in place for home run calls since August 2008. Commissioner Bud Selig initially wanted to add trap plays and fair/foul calls down the lines for 2013, but change was put off while more radical options were examined.

Speaking to the Baseball Writers' Association of America on Tuesday, Torre said ''we're still in the tweaking stages'' and ''we're not limiting ourselves.''

An agreement would be needed with the unions and players and umpires.

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  • Fozzy
    Lv 7
    7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    I think there is a lot more to expanding replay than most people realize.

    While I am in favor with using it to get the calls right, my main concern is how to correct a blown call.

    We are not talking about football where most replays simply make for a change in possession or whether or not a ball was caught legally. Those sorts of corrections are easy to make.

    But how would you handle a replay that shows that a ball that was called foul was in fat fair. Easy enough if it's a home run call, but what about calls that are made on balls that stay in play?

    For example - let's say you have the bases loaded with 2 outs. A right handed hitter hits a little flare down the right field line that is called foul by the first base umpire. Upon review te ball is determined to have actually been fair. Now what happens? Do we assume a double for the hitter and allow 2 runs to score while placing the runner who was on first base on third? What if the count was 3-2 and all the runners were going with the pitch? What if the runners were all incredibly slow? What if the right fielder was shifted was over towards center field? Do you then maybe give a faster hitter a triple assuming that's what he would have had? And what sort of allowance do you make for the strength of the right fielder's arm? Perhaps a good defensive fielder would get to the ball and throw the hitter out at second base.

    I have no issue with expanding replay (with the exception of ball and strike calls). The one thing that will have to change is going to be that umpires will have to let these close plays play themselves out. Any ball that is even CLOSE to being fair would probably need to be called that way and then reviewed. A ball called fair that proves to be foul is a simple correction. A ball called foul that is really fair will open up a huge can of worms and probably result in even more arguments.

    Not a bad idea, but I'd like to see them tinker with it during spring training games for a couple of seasons to get the umpires retrained to perhaps NOT make the right call.

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  • 4 years ago

    I was actually thinking about this yesterday in fact. I always wondered if MLB would ever do this and it's funny it came up now. I think it's interesting but probably not in the best interest of teams. I mean depending on how people look at it, religion can play an important role in people's lives but having days dedicated is a little fuzzy. It is respectful don't get me wrong, but I don't think religion should be brought up in baseball games as people can be pretty disrespectful towards certain religious groups. Some might even boycott the games for example. Baseball games should just remain public, if someone passes away, a team should have a moment of silence and all but introducing faith days is a little silly. I'm Russian Orthodox for example but I wouldn't want the Blue Jays to have a "Russian Orthodox" night at the Roger's Centre. I mean it would really clash with baseball.

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  • 7 years ago

    FINALLY! I honestly never understood the arguments against instant replay. Bottom line is that baseball has a chance to improve with added technology and bad calls will not

    Does replay solve everything? No. Of course, there will still be mistakes made, as shown in that Oakland-Cleveland game earlier this year with the botched home run call. But just because every single call still won't be made correctly is not a valid reason to keep it the way it is. We are able to decrease the amount of bad calls which can blow huge games. This is GOOD.

    We have two choices. We can stay in the past, or we can move with the present and adapt. I choose the latter.

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  • blu
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Agree more so than not.

    How much more embarrassing can it be for MLB to follow the example f/ the Little League World Series? The kids made the seamless transition (extensive replay) while the pros drag their feet. There is so much wrong w/ this equation but the problematic source is the typical stodgy fan resistant to considering improvement.

    I don't contribute often in this category but when I do, this is a topic I have been very outspoken about.

    It has boggled my mind for decades how these inflexible fans call them self purists while they endure the never ending onslaught of bad calls that were avoidable. Their typical response is, "It's part of the game." ... that doesn't mean improvement is not possible.

    If any changes are made ... it won't be enough.

    Don't just put a toe in the water ... jump in. It has been the 21st century more than a dozen yrs.

    Arguing calls delay the game.

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  • 7 years ago

    If anything, instant replay has shown all of us just how inaccurate umpires really are. Granted, umpires only have one shot at any call at normal speed yet under close examination umpires really do screw up a lot of calls.

    They've done everything else in baseball, why not this? At least try it out during spring training first to see what the general reaction will be and how it ultimately effects the outcome of games.

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  • 7 years ago

    I like the way it is going, because no one likes a ruined game due to a huge mistaken call like a few years ago. The hard part will be determining how many bases to give, if the runner scores , etc. Baseball is going in the right direction though. They just need to sort out a few things to make it fair for both teams at the end of the day.

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  • Kevin
    Lv 6
    7 years ago

    I like the slow installation of instant replay. Soon, we will expand to foul balls and hits, which will be good. All we have to do is make sure the replays don't slow down the game.

    I think it is great that MLB is finally getting to use the extensive technology of the 21st century.

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  • 7 years ago

    I definitely agree. It may be difficult to enforce fair/foul review rules. Players will need to learn to play on whenever there is a ball that may have been fair. I don't think they should expand to balls and strikes, as it would take all human element from the game and the games would be way too long.

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  • 7 years ago

    I think the MLB needs to go even farther. Technology has advanced enough now to put those striped shirt guys out to pasture. They do it in Horse racing, and some other "sports" why not baseball?

    With 20/400 vision in my one remaining eye, everyone would get a pass, LOLOL.

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  • 7 years ago

    It is not going to delay games that much. How often do they review home runs. If they have one review a game, it will still be 3 or 4 reviews fewer than a typical football game.

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