What is the Definition of Foriegn Military Base?

The Constitution of the Philippines purportedly prohibits any Foreign Military Bases on Philippines territory. What is a base? Certainly the big old bases at Subic and Clark AFB were typical US military bases: huge, sprawling, with airstrips, barracks, golf courses, officer clubs, base housing consisting of... show more The Constitution of the Philippines purportedly prohibits any Foreign Military Bases on Philippines territory. What is a base? Certainly the big old bases at Subic and Clark AFB were typical US military bases: huge, sprawling, with airstrips, barracks, golf courses, officer clubs, base housing consisting of suburban tract homes, typical US style elementary and high schools, theaters, shopping malls, American fast food restaurants, etc.. These were typical cold war era mega bases, like those in Europe, to showcase how great America was and to lure our friends away from the Communist bloc.
Today, the income gap between our allies have narrowed, and the internet and global TV coverage does a better job of displaying the real, and often not so great anymore America; and the super deluxe mega bases like Clark AFB may be viewed as being arrogant in a place like the Philippines that suffers from so much poverty and other deprivation. So if Clark AFB clearly was a base, what is 'not a base'? Certainly a US soldier visiting the Phlippines staying in a hotel room is not a base, but what about when US soldiers pitch a tent and camp out within an AFP Philippines military bases, does tent stakes and canvas walls make a base, in the legal technical sense of the word?

Clarification is needed.

Secondly, the Chinese have constructed a huge, elaborate concrete military structure on Mischief Reef, which is well within the 200 mile EEZ of the Philippines, only about 100 Miles from the main island of Palawan, but about 1000 miles from mainland China. This military base consists of concrete bunkers, helicopter landing pads, missile launchers, barracks, loading docks, refueling depots, radar, electronic warfare and spying facilities, etc. etc.. how exactly is this not a foreign military base? why does the government & media of the Philippines seem to ignore this Chinese Military base on Philippines territory, and how does the Philippines reconcile this with their constitution that purportedly prohibits foreign military bases? http://ts3.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.461274439...

My questions are: What is the definition of a base? What is the definition of Territory? Which is worse, a US military base or AFP base access by the US military that the president of the Philippines approves of, and feels is needed..... or a Chinese Communist Military Base on Phillippines Territory, that exists without the permission of the Philippines Government, and is against the protests of the Philippines government, and is used to threaten and bully the Philippines, and to prevent Filipino fishermen from sailing within their own territorial waters?

How would Filipinos feel if the US built a military base similar to the Chinese base, and right next door, within the territorial waters of the Philippines? Would Filipinos continue to ignore the Chinese base and only protest the US base?

Hypothetically speaking.
Update: The Philippines Constitution does not, in fact, impose an absolute ban on foreign military bases in the Philippines, Section 25 of Article XVIII states: "foreign military bases, troops, or facilities shall not be allowed in the Philippines except under a treaty duly concurred in by the Senate". two... show more The Philippines Constitution does not, in fact, impose an absolute ban on foreign military bases in the Philippines, Section 25 of Article XVIII states: "foreign military bases, troops, or facilities shall not be allowed in the Philippines except under a treaty duly concurred in by the Senate". two enabling conditions specify: ratification of the treaty in a national referendum "when the Congress so requires", and recognition of the treaty, as treaty, "by the other contracting state".

Is a national referendum really needed to ratify or clarify the long standing 1951 US - Philippine Mutual Defense treaty? Or do we simply conclude that since the US-Philippine defense treaty was ratified long ago, that the Philippines president may allow US bases at any time? Maybe a national referendum is needed to clarify the duty of the Government to deal with the unlawful Chinese military base now located within the territory of the Philippines, which is unlawful du
Update 2: Tibet was a slightly different story because it was led by pacifist monks who foolishly thought a 'ghandi' approach would work on invading Chinese communist troops. No foreign nation would help Tibet or other nation that refused help, or refused to help itself. This is why China works so hard on communist... show more Tibet was a slightly different story because it was led by pacifist monks who foolishly thought a 'ghandi' approach would work on invading Chinese communist troops. No foreign nation would help Tibet or other nation that refused help, or refused to help itself. This is why China works so hard on communist subversion within the Philippines, knowing the US will not interfere if Filipinos refuse help or refuse to help themselves.
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