Vivian asked in Society & CultureRoyalty ยท 7 years ago

How do you address royalty?

What are the proper titles and ranks for royalty? Any links would be helpful.

8 Answers

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  • 7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    It depends on the person of royalty or nobility you are addressing.

    To address an Emperor or Empress, you may say, "Your Imperial Majesty".

    To address an Imperial Prince or Imperial Princess, you may say, "Your Imperial Highness".

    To address a King or Queen, you may say, "Your Majesty".

    To address a Sultan, you may say, "Your Majesty".

    To address a Royal Prince or Royal Princess, you may say, "Your Royal Highness".

    To address a Royal Duke or Royal Duchess, you may say, "Your Royal Highness".

    To address a head of a non-reigning Royal family, you may say, "Your Royal Highness".

    To address a member of a non-reigning Royal family, you may say, "Your Royal Highness".

    To address a Sultan of a sub-national monarchy, you may say, "Your Royal Highness".

    To address the Grand Duke of Luxembourg, you may say, "Your Royal Highness".

    To address a member of the Grand Ducal Family of Luxembourg, you may say, "Your Royal Highness".

    To address a member of other Grand Ducal families, you may say, "Your Grand Ducal Highness".

    To address a Prince or Princess of lower rank, you may say, "Your Highness".

    To address the President of the UAE, you may say, "Your Highness".

    To address an Emir of one of the seven emirates of the UAE, you may say, "Your Highness".

    To address a reigning Prince or Princess, you may say, "Your Serene Highness".

    To address a member of a Princely family, you may say, "Your Serene Highness".

    To address a religious leader, you may say, "Your Holiness".

    To address the Prince and Grand Master of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, you may say, "Your Most Eminent Highness".

    To address the Co-Princes of Andorra, you may say, "Your Excellency".

    To address a non-royal Duke or Duchess, you may say, "Your Grace".

    Hope this helps!

  • 7 years ago

    Emperor/Empress- Your Imperial Majesty

    King/Queen- Your Majesty/Your Royal Majesty

    Prince/Princess- Your Imperial Highness/Your Royal Highness/Your Highness/Your Serene Highness

  • Lili
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    For all forms of address, from royalty through the various ranks of the peerage, family members, and others in the UK (such as the clergy and the judiciary), see the very useful site below.

    Note that this site and the Debrett's site posted by MHG apply solely to the United Kingdom. In other nations, other forms (in other languages, of course) are used.

  • For a King or Queen, Emperor or Empress, the correct form of address is 'Your Majesty'. For other members of the royal family, it is 'Your Royal Highness'. In the case of Prince Albert of Monaco, he is a Serene Highness, so he would be addressed as 'Your Serene Highness'.

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  • 7 years ago

    Her Majesty The Queen, Buckingham Palace, London shall suffice, dear Vivian. You know, there are some who would even provide you with the postcode but one has yet to meet any self-respecting postman who did not know where Buckingham Palace was.

  • 7 years ago

    To a King or Queen "Your Majesty" the others are Royal Highnesses,these pompous titles were brought about by "Richard II " WHO WAS A REAL SELF-OPINIONATED LITTLE TWERP.

  • A king or queen is addressed as Your Majesty the first time you speak to them in a meeting, and thereafter as Sir or Ma'am (rhymes with ham).

    A prince or princess is addressed at Your Royal Highness the first time you speak to them in a meeting, and thereafter as Sir or Ma'am.

    In all cases, you should bow at the neck or curtsey when first introduced. You should not shake hands or touch the royal. You should also refrain from asking direct questions.

    This is the best site for further information (click on Forms of Address if that it what you need): http://www.debretts.com/

    .

    Source(s): Debrett's Etiquette and Modern Manners
  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Hi Ya - innit.

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