College Algebra Help!!!!?

Can any one solve this? t^1/2+t^1/4+1=0

3 Answers

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  • 8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Let u = t^1/4. Then u² = (t^1/4)² = t^1/2, and we can rewrite the equation like this:

    u² + u + 1 = 0.

    The equation won't factor, so we use the Quadratic Formula to solve:

    u = {-1 +/- √[(1)² - 4(1)(1)]} / 2(1)

    u = [-1 +/- √(1 - 4)] / 2

    u = (-1 +/- √-3) / 2

    u = -1/2 +/- i√3.

    Back substitute to find t:

    t^1/4 = -1/2 +/- i√3, which implies t = (-1/2 + i2√3)^4 or t = (-1/2 - i2√3)^4.

    I will let you multiply the mess out to find t. Remember however, that i² = -1.

  • 8 years ago

    The best place for these math problems i have found is: http://www.wolframalpha.com/

    not sure about this one-

    http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=t^1%2F2%2Bt^1...

    it says there is no soloution....

    Source(s): wolframalpha.com
  • 8 years ago

    Go to your "professor" and ask him what PEDMAS means, and "what is a parentheses?"

    You formula is posted WRONG!

    Source(s): I translate between the new math and old school algebra.
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