Why is it grammatically correct to start a sentence with "aren't"?

"Aren't you coming to visit?" "Aren't I going to the school field trip?" That's the equivalent of saying, "Are not you coming to visit," or "are not I going to the school field trip?" You wouldn't say that. Instead, you'd say "Are you not coming to... show more "Aren't you coming to visit?" "Aren't I going to the school field trip?" That's the equivalent of saying, "Are not you coming to visit," or "are not I going to the school field trip?" You wouldn't say that. Instead, you'd say "Are you not coming to visit?" "Am I not going to the school field trip?" Difference.
Update: Quatt47 -- "Aren't is a contraction of are not." You didn't think that I already established that within my question? It's obvious that you didn't bother to read the details of this question to get why I found this grammatically incorrect to say.
Update 2: Quatt47-- Another thing--and I actually forget to put this within the first comment to you--"are you not coming today" and "are you coming today" don't necessarily mean the same thing; "are you not coming" implies that it has been previously established earlier that you were in... show more Quatt47-- Another thing--and I actually forget to put this within the first comment to you--"are you not coming today" and "are you coming today" don't necessarily mean the same thing; "are you not coming" implies that it has been previously established earlier that you were in fact coming, but you don't show up on time and you're running on 5-10 minutes late. "Are you coming" implies that you just asked out of random, that there has been no establishments made as to rather or not you are coming, this is the first time any sort of establishment were to be made. You really can't just randomly say "are you not coming" if there has been no previously made comments about it.
7 answers 7