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mark asked in Games & RecreationGambling · 7 years ago

I have recieved a an email, saying I won 5 millions U.S. dollar for winning yahoo lottery, Is it true?

Thanks for your email response. This is to inform you that we have successfully confirmed the information you sent to this office to enable us process and remit your winning amount to you. Firstly, I want to use this medium to once again congratulate you for being a winner of our New Year Lottery Program organized by Yahoo Asia .

Please note that this Promotional Program tagged "Thanks for contributing to our financial Success" was sponsored and organized by the Yahoo Asia, Asia's Leading e-mail and internet service provider.

Your e-mail address attached to ticket number 883734657492-5319 with serial number 7263-267, batch number 8254297137 which drew lucky numbers 14-22-28-37-40-44 which consequently won you the sum of Five Million United States Dollars(5,000,000.00USD) in the 1st category.However, we clearly stated out in our lottery terms and condition various modality which those who emerged lucky winners are to use in collecting their prize money.

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  • 7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    100% scam.

    There is no lottery, draw or raffle.

    There is no Yahoo, ESPN, HSBC, Skype, Facebook, Nokia, Shell, BBC, Google, Coca-Cola, MSN, Microsoft, BMW or any other company in the entire world that sponsors a contest that notifies winners via email, phone call or text.

    There is only a scammer trying to steal your hard-earned money.

    The next email will be from another of the scammer's fake names and free email addresses pretending to be the "lottery official" and will demand you pay for made-up fees and taxes, in cash, and only by Western Union or moneygram.

    Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

    Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his 'potential sucker' list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

    You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

    Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don't bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn't worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

    Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even partial sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

    If you google "fake yahoo lottery", "lotto Western Union fraud" or something similar, you will find hundreds of posts of victims and near-victims of this type of scam.

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  • Jay P
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Yahoo does not run a lottery.

    Such emails are designed to either steal your ID/credit information and/or have you send in money to "process the claim" or whatever other way the scammers word.

    The truth is there is no lottery and there is no prize money.

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    It's a scam like all the other Yahoo lottery offers.

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  • 7 years ago

    Be wary of any you've won emails or letters which offer or send you a "Cashiers" check to cover any expenses in order to claim your prize. Cashiers checks are easily faked and most banks will cash them against your acct. only to return as a fake check weeks later. Then you are responsible for the amount of the check cashed. Easiest rule : if it sounds to good to be true it probably is.

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  • 7 years ago

    It is a scam

    If it was true i would be a BILLIONAIRE at this time

    Yahoo or any other place doesnt run a lottery

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  • 7 years ago

    Sadly there is many of these scams going around atm, i myself have won many lotterys i have never entered!

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    It wont be true it will probly be a virus i get them all the time

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    i received one of these too.But i opened it in a Virtual PC to find out its a virus if i was you i would delete it.

    Source(s): Myself Yea :)
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  • 7 years ago

    No, sorry.

    It is a scam.

    .

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