Is a 4.26 weighted GPA good enough to get into a college such as MIT?

I am currently a sophomore in high school and I am interested in pursuing a career in some sort of engineering. I would like to get into one of the best schools out there so I would really appreciate your help and guidance... Thanks :)

Also, it would be great if you could tell me what AP classes I should take in order to get into such a college for engineering... Is four years of foreign language necessary? Etc...

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  • 7 years ago
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    Okay, your GPA REALLY good, but it's not everything. It's more of where you are ranked among your classmates, and your extracurricular activities. Join clubs and get involved. Most of the people I know that went to top ranking schools participated in a couple of science fairs like this one http://www.societyforscience.org/isef/ and won or was runner up, and they went to summer camps held at MIT or whatever school they wanted to get into. It's a good way of seeing what you like and what it would be like at these schools (You might also be able to ask for a college recommendation letter from one of the faculty members at the school if you get to know them well enough). If not, I would recommend trying to get an internship or research position at places like NASA, NIST, DoD, ATK, Lockheed Martin, wherever you're interested.. during your breaks.

    For engineering you want a solid foundation of physics and calculus, so I would take AP physics and calculus. And depending on what type of engineering you want to do (mechanical, electrical, bio, aerospace, computer...) you might want to consider taking AP Physics E&M , biology, computer science, chemistry...

    The language requirement really depends on the university you want to apply to. Some only require 2 yrs of foreign language classes and others none at all. So know the admissions requirements for the schools you want to go to.

    As an engineering major, your college workload will be really tough, so the more classes you can knock out with AP credits the better, and even if those credits don't carry over you'll still have the background knowledge.

    best of luck to you!

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  • 7 years ago

    It depends, what is your unweighted GPA? If your school is like my son's and properly weights only up to 4.3 maximum (.3 is the weighting), then yes, your GPA is likely good enough to be competitive, but not necessarily to be admitted, as most applicants have similar GPAs. However, if your school inflates grades, like that's a 4.26 out of a possible 5.0, nope, you'd be way at the bottom of the applicant pool and not competitive. You want a 4.0 unweighted GPA (or very very close) in the most rigorous classes.

    You should take all the AP classes you can get A's in and 5's on the AP test. An A means nothing if you get a 1 or 2 on the test. 3 isn't much better, makes it look like it wasn't a true AP class. AP Calculus AB and BC (BC is more important), Physics C, Chemistry, Biology, English Language and Composition or English Literature and Composition, Foreign Language, Art History, etc. Some are helpful for admission (like the math and science), some will give you credit, if you get a 5 on the test, toward GE classes. Look on MIT's website for specific info.

    Yes, you should take 4 years of one foreign language for any top college if you want to be competitive. If you want to just meet the minimum, MIT requires 2 years, but much of the competition will have 4 years as they are also applying to Stanford, Harvard, etc and want to be competitive.

    Use your summers wisely, do lots of community service, at least 300+ hours by the beginning of your senior year, more is better. Do summer programs related to your major or future profession. Study for the SAT, you'll want at least a 2300 to be competitive. You'll want state and national awards, like in science / math / engineering fairs and competitions. Start looking into them so you can see if you can work on anything during the summer.

    Good luck!

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  • 7 years ago

    Yes, it is good enough. But, you still probably will not get in. The competition is like a lottery at schools like that, check out the statistics.

    If all it took to get into MIT was to take a set of classes and excel, then half the country would be going. Me too :).

    There are thousands of perfect applicants every year, they can only take so many. There are tens of thousands of high schools in the US all with their own valedictorians, all with their own students that want to go to MIT. You have to figure out how to stand out among an applicant pool of basically perfect students. How do you do that? I have no sure-fire way or really any ideas, but basically you are already behind the 8-ball here. Students who want to get into MIT spend their entire high school careers trying to stand out in different ways and doing different accomplishments, and then they still do not get in. Know what I mean?

    Just search for MIT on this website, this exact same question gets asked about 4-5 times a day that just I see, this goes on everyday and has been probably forever. You could find thousands of questions just like yours, thousands of people who want to go to MIT, only a few are selected given capacity limits. How do you decide who gets into a school when all your applicants are awesomely qualified? Why would they select you instead of someone else? Answer that, and you can get into MIT. But, outside of that I do not have any ideas for what you need to do, I think you are already behind. There are lots of great schools, MIT is just something you know about. Find other ones as well, you can be happy outside of MIT.

    " Is four years of foreign language necessary? Etc..." Everything is necessary, like I said, there is no threshold you reach where you do just enough and then you get accepted. Something you do not do, someone else *is* doing which reflects negatively on you. Know what I mean?

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