Articles on Sudan/South Sudan?

I need to write a paper for world geography discussing the split between sudan and south sudan. I need to know how it started, who was involved, important people and dates, etc. I can only find articles on recent events of sudan though. Can anyone name some articles that might be useful (NOT WIKIPEDIA) so I can get and idea of the FULL story? It'd help a ton, thanks!

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  • Mjinga
    Lv 7
    8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    In the 1950's Britain was withdrawing from Sudan. It had a choice to attach South Sudan to Uganda or attach it to North Sudan. Uganda was Christian and Animist, and so was South Sudan. North Sudan is Moslem and Arabic speaking. Some tribes in Uganda speak same or similar language to people in South Sudan.

    Britain decided to attach South Sudan to the North. The North promise equality and power sharing but never gave it. Eventually the south rebelled and fought from 1955 to 1972. The Moslem grew tired and a peace deal was arranged. The North did not abide by the agreement and eventaully the war started again 1983-2005. John Garang led the rebellion for the south.

    http://www.smallarmssurveysudan.org/fileadmin/docs...

    http://web.archive.org/web/20041210024759/http://w...

    http://web.archive.org/web/20051227024857/http://h...

    http://web.archive.org/web/20051221045218/http://w...

    www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-14019202

    www1.american.edu/ted/ice/sudan.htm

    Source(s): Lived and worked in North Sudan and South Sudan
  • 5 years ago

    Hey now doll. I won't get into to much however does the U.S. Suppose they ought to be "concerned" in but another country to impose our idea of democracy & freedom with a view to help our lust & greed for oil? Mustn't we be extra involved and worried to stop the inhumanity & genocide of non-arab individuals there? We wave our flag of "freedom" yet we proceed to let this attrocious & disgusting trouble go on given that our "diplomacy" tells us not to. Hmmm...Double-commonplace democracy, might be?

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