Poker Tournaments Vs Cash Game?

So i'm a decent Cash Game player, I feel like I can actually compete and be profitable. However, when it comes to Tournaments I know I'm a fish, there's no doubt about it. I'm not sure how to compensate for the rising blinds and it seems like people are looser and raise more often. Here are my questions:

For tournaments, do you have a wider range of hands from all positions because the blinds are increasing? How much wider if this is true?

Do you raise more frequently in all positions with a wider range of hands? Do you take on more risk by doing things like shoving with flush draws? What would you say your fold percentage is generally? What hands do you typically play from like position 1? mid position? Late position?

Lets say you have A 10 in a tournament, raised, got three callers and flop comes 10 9 2. Do you play it the same as in cash being first to act?

What are your shoving ranges pre-flop? Cash game I limit myself to AK, QQ, KK, AA. Is it common to make a deep shove with like 10 10? How about a medium shove?

Any other big differences I should be aware of? Are people generally looser in tournaments?

5 Answers

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  • 8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    I'm not a tourney player either but some general things:

    1) Learn ICM. Not knowing it is almost like playing a cash game without knowing pot odds.

    2) In tourneys, the average non-shark is a worse player than the average cash game non-shark at similar stakes. (Even the WSOP has plenty of outright bad players.)

    3) Small edges aren't worth your whole stack early/mid tourney. You don't wanna get all-in preflop with JJ vs AK early in a tourney even though you'd be more than happy to in a cash game. Guys like Hellmuth and Mizraki have had a lot of success by avoiding small-edge races. Negraneau takes it a step further with "small-ball", trying to minimize the preflop commitment so that he can fully exploit his postflop edge (your biggest edge against worse opponents comes from your superior postflop play).

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Survive Everywhere http://givitry.info/SurviveAlmostAnything
  • 8 years ago

    it all depends on stack size and blinds. i would suggest staying away from turbos and go for longer tourneys as the adjustment would be less and poker ability would have time to come through. as for ways to play i think each table/tourney is different and the best way is to monitor the range of your opponents. a large stack is a huge advantage as the tourney goes on but eventually the blinds decide the pace in the end. however the buzz and pride in winning tourneys is in my opinion more satisfying than winning a cash game and with less risk and more reward.

  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    I'm poker player like you, if you want to get less traffic and get more prize pool in tourneys you have to try different poker site, about the tourneys just wait until u hit then push, if you see that you u have AK and someone reraise you sometimes it better to fold pref lop and let it go. That my strategy to play

    Source(s): i recommend you to try this poker rooms http://fastpokercash.webs.com/us-poker-rooms so you may got lucky
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  • Devin
    Lv 4
    8 years ago

    First, I would read Harrington's books on tournament play. Focus on calculating M (it is like playing by your BB stack size, except it accounts for antes as well).

    "Do you raise more frequently in all positions with a wider range of hands?"

    Early on, no. Early on it is just like a cash game, where most people have 50-100+ BBs. You can still play a wide range of hands like suited connectors, suited aces, lots of PPs, etc especially from late position. You can call quite a bit from LP and raise as you normally would in a cash game. Basically, this level is no different than a cash game other than the aspect of survival.

    I think where you get this notion from is mid-late levels. Generally a lot of players won't have more than 30-40 BBs. Many players will fall into the 5-20 BB range, where stealing blinds and antes once a round becomes utter survival for them. That is, you'd rather steal the free money than have to race just to double up over and over. At this level, you try to find any credible circumstance where you can try to steal the blinds. The blinds tend to tighten up a bit, since calling a raise could be a good portion of their stack. So you start to raise from mid-late position more just on the hopes that people will fold. In a cash game, this makes less sense because you will get more people defending their blinds, plus 1.5 BBs in a cash game isn't worth as much as 1.5 BB, plus antes, when you only have 20 BBs (you've just increased your stack 15% versus 1.5% in a cash game).

    "Do you take on more risk by doing things like shoving with flush draws?"

    There are different schools of thought on this. One is to shove with reasonable equity, because your opponent doesn't want to call off his stack himself. The Hellmuth school of thinking is that it is stupid to shove your money in with a 35% chance of winning for your tournament life and it is better to survive and keep playing because you are generally better than others and can outplay them down the road. Personally, I think it is heavily dependent on timing. If you are getting low and the next level is coming up (blinds, antes go up) you may want to try to steal the chips now and risk it. If, on the other hand, the table is weak and you still have a good amount of chips, why shove 30 BBs versus an equal stack, when the long-term looks so good?

    "What would you say your fold percentage is generally? What hands do you typically play from like position 1? mid position? Late position?"

    Again, early on I would play just like a cash game. Later on, I would raise more in opportunistic spots in order to steal. In mid-late game, I'm raising premium hands from EP, adding KQ, KJ, KT, QJ, QTs, 66+, etc in mid-pos vs a tight table. Vs an aggro table, I'll more likely raise with hands that I would call a re-shove with. In mid-LP I'll raise with anything slightly reasonable versus weaker blinds. LP, raise anything if blinds are folding. If I'm short, I also love shoving against a couple of limpers with a wide range of hands. You HAVE to be willing to go earn free chips when you are getting short, yet still have enough chips that others will fold. Once you are down to 5 big blinds or less, you may need a better hand versus multiple opponents, since people are less likely to fold.

    "Lets say you have A 10 in a tournament, raised, got three callers and flop comes 10 9 2. Do you play it the same as in cash being first to act? "

    Where did you raise from? How many BBs do you have? What are there stack sizes? Not enough information here to tell you anything. None of this has to do with whether or not we are in a tournament or cash game, it is about our stack size, opponents' stack sizes, speed of the tournament, table's skill level, etc. If you had 12 BBs in a cash game, you'd play the same way. In short, the only differences are survival aspect and tournament speed (shorter levels, more gambling, longer levels, less gambling).

    Here's the personal advice I picked up from my friend, re-shoving in mid-late stages. Basically you find hands that are decent and do well in a showdown vs opponent's range and re-shove against chronic blind stealers. You do this with 13-20 BBs. Sometimes you'll run into a real hand, but often you'll - 1) get the money or 2) make him raise less in the future, allowing you to steal yourself. With antes, the re-shove is a great way to build a stack. Let's say it is 300-600 with $50 antes, 10 players. The stealer raises 3x to 1,800. Now you shove your 15 BB stack of 7,500 and win the pot. You just picked up $3,200 and increased your stack by 50%!! It is not something to be abused, but it can be a critical tool in your game to help you stay out of small stack territory and build up to a playable stack.

    Source(s): "Any other big differences I should be aware of? Are people generally looser in tournaments?" I don't think people are intentionally looser, in general, there are just worse players in general. Moreover, people are forced to play more because they have fewer BBs and need to keep winning chips. In a cash game you could wait all day for premium hands and that would work just fine in most cases. You would go broke in a tournament waiting for AA-QQ only.
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