Is mainstream commercial rap music a main root of problems in the Black community?

This honestly isn't a question to bash all rap music, because I think rap music is a great source of inspiration and learning for youth, but my question focuses more on commercial rap music. The only reason I ask this question is because we would have to be lying to ourselves if we denied the fact that a... show more This honestly isn't a question to bash all rap music, because I think rap music is a great source of inspiration and learning for youth, but my question focuses more on commercial rap music.

The only reason I ask this question is because we would have to be lying to ourselves if we denied the fact that a disproportionate amount of African American youth listen to and are influenced by hip hop music.

Why can't hip hop artists like Nas, Mos Def, Lupe Fiasco, Common and the Roots (musicians who actively discuss deep social, political, and cultural issues) be the majority when it comes to rap music? While artists like Lil Wayne, Gucci Mane, and Waka Flocka (musicians who encourage party promoting, self-degrading, materialistic, violent messages) be the minority?

It just troubles me that more people, especially those part of the black community, don't question things like: "why is it that most genres of music marketed towards mainly white people never have negative, culturally degrading, self-harming messages in the music? This includes genres like alternative rock, indie, folk, blue grass, country, techno.

Music that is oftentimes marketed towards black youth (hip hop, rap) disproportionally carry these messages in the songs.. with the exception of R&B (which I love), most music marketed towards young black people carry overwhelmingly violent messages and images.

I mean, why don't people question why it is that generations of older black folks - people who lived and breathed the Civil Rights Era, for the most part, despise modern rap music and culture? Would Civil Rights leaders and activists like Martin Luther King Jr. be an avid listener of Wiz Khalifa or Drake?

I think it's mainly a cultural issue... even though there are plenty of white people who listen to rap and hip hop music, white culture (mainly popular culture) encourages white people to find nice jobs, start families, and enjoy some of the finer things in life (such as traveling, nature, getting a taste for different cultures), meanwhile black culture (or at least stereotypes) imply that black people should aspire to be gangsta, have swag, be real/be hood and further pushes stereotypes that infact discourage black people from experiencing the finer things in life (such as that most black people thing nature is scary, most black people would never consider traveling to Europe or Asia, and that getting a nice job is considered "acting white").

I don't know, I feel that there are a lot of structural cultural barriers that prevent a lot of people in the black people from moving forward.


Just a thought.
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