mango asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 8 years ago

Would you answer my questions about English expressions?

1. I am in 4th grade from Mara elementary school.

=> Does it make sense? I want to put in one sentence what grade I am and what school I go to.

2. Today I will tell you my special trip to Japanese ancient three Kingdoms – A, B, and C (their names).

In old times, there are three kindoms in Japan. I've been interested in these kingdoms for a long time. At first, let me start from A.

3. Most castles are made of stones, but the castle on Mick mountain was made of soil.

=> made of? made up of? Which one is better?

2 Answers

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  • 8 years ago
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    1._______

    I am in 4th grade at Mara Elementary School. - This is the most common USA-English way to say it.

    I am in the 4th grade at Mara Elementary School. - Slightly more proper USA-English.

    Either way, if the sign out in front of Mara school says "Mara Elementary School" then all words must be capitalized as a Proper Noun. Only if you refer to the school as a general noun can it be left un-capitalized: I am in 4th grade at Mara, which is an elementary school.

    2._______

    Today I will tell you about my special trip to three ancient Japanese Kingdoms - A, B, and C. In the past, there were three kingdoms in Japan. I've been interested in these kingdoms for a long time. To begin, let me start with A.

    You need the "about" to make a correct phrase in the main clause of the sentence: "I will tell you about (A,B,C)."

    "In old times" is incorrect English. You can write "In olden times" but it sounds very awkward aloud and would be poor for a speech or presentation. "In the past" is the most common USA-English phrase used. "In ancient times" is equally correct, but you've already used "ancient" so that is why I selected the simpler phrase, "In the past"

    3rd sentence is perfect!

    "At first" is an idiom which does not work in this. "At first I thought I heard you call me, but..." "It was hard at first, but became easier" are both examples. "To begin," (the comma is important) is the most common phrase *but* often you'll see "To begin with" and the "with" often should not be in the phrase. Imagine your sentence is saying "To begin telling you about my special trip, let me start from A." Then take away "telling you about my special trip" and you are left with "To begin, let me start with A."

    3._______

    Most castles are made of stone, but the castle on Mick Mountain was made of soil. -or-

    Most castles are made up of stones, but the castle on Mick Mountain was made of soil.

    "Made up of" is usually followed by several substances, such as ingredients or materials. "Made of" works best for your sentence. It sounds better if you simplify and also make your nouns agree with one another - make both collective nouns - "stone" (collective noun) and "soil" (collective noun), not "stones" (many individual stones) and soil (collective noun). "Mick Mountain" is capitalized if that is the proper noun for the mountain. If you use it as a general noun, it need not be capitalized: "Most castles are made of stone, but the castle on this mountain, known as Mick Mountain, was made of soil.

    Hope this helps you.

    Source(s): I specify "USA-English" not to promote USA English over another form, but to show awareness that this Answer is using this form of English.
  • 8 years ago

    1) I am from Mara elementary school, and i'm in 4th grade

    2) today, I shall tell you about my trip to three ancient Japanese kingdoms, A,B and C

    A very long time ago, there were 3 kingdoms in Japan, and I have always been interested in these kingdoms. I will begin with A....

    3) Most castles are made of stone, however the castle on Mick mountain is (was...?) built with soil instead.

    That's how I would say it ^_^

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