Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Consumer ElectronicsCamcorders · 7 years ago

LCD not working after replacement on a Kodak V803?

I have had this camera for a while, (and I take very good care of things), there was not a scratch on it. But, recently a little kid found it and cracked the screen (>_<). I purchased a replacement screen on eBay for $15 and replaced it. It worked for about a week or two, then a small line appeared in the LCD. I thought the connector for the LCD inside was becoming loose, so I opened it up again and reconnected it. Still didn't fix it... About a week after that I turned it on to find the screen fading to white. Every time I turned it on the image would show for about 1-2sec then fade to white. Now the screen is not turning on at all, but when I opened it a third time, was still connected. It still takes pictures (So I know the bored isn't shorted), but I get absolutely no image through the screen now. Being that I am only 15, I can't afford another camera, and I really do like this one, how do I fix it, if possible? Thanks in advance for your help.

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  • 7 years ago
    Best Answer

    Hi "N":

    First, congratulations for getting your clever parts swap-out to work at all!

    Mini LCD screens and the thin mylar ribbon cables that run them can be tough to deal with, and getting the FFC (flexible flat cable) seated properly into the special connector can be hit-or-miss (especially if it has a small locking snap section). (This is probably where your white-screen is coming from.)

    FFC ribbons are also prone to tiny hairline cracks in the "printed circuit" conductors (which are hard to spot), and could be another explanation about your intermittent screen operation. Large electronics stores (here in Texas we have Fry's and Altex) have special dissolved-copper "printed circuit repair" paint or pens to fix that. You can find it on the web as well.

    I've had similar problems with both laptop LCDs and larger PC monitors with LCD panels. Some of it is just trial & error until you get the ribbon cable to seat "just right".

    hope this helps,

    --Dennis C.

     

    Source(s): Video & electronics professional over 4 decades. Former repair bench tech.
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