Can I get American citizenship?

I'm 19, born in Toronto, Canada. My dad was born in Montreal to American parents. He spent much of his childhood in the US and was indeed himself a US citizen.. having been born to American parents. My mum is Canadian (btw)

I wasn't born with US citizenship because my dad, in a foolish act of teenage rebellion against his parents, voluntarily renounced his citizenship and moved back here to Canada. Now, my grandfather has since died, but my grandmother is still a US citizen. Is there anyway for me to claim it because of this? Or maybe because my dad is a former citizen?

Or is it simply not possible?

I actually really like America despite all its flaws.(sorry guys, but you know it's true) And I would love to live and work there. Some of my best memories growing up are spending my summers in Florida living with my relatives.. I just hate the fact that my dad had to renounce his citizenship and therefore I have to suffer the consequences because of it.

Update:

No unfortunately my dad got rid of it long before I was born. :p I guess I should've mentioned that.

Update 2:

lol what's with all the self-loathing? You guys are the richest country on Earth! My mum has a small townhouse with no garage that cost her nearly 400 thousand dollars. In the US you could have a palace for that price. And don't say that our dollar isn't worth what yours is, last time I checked our dollars were worth the exact same.

Update 3:

Wait, in the US aren't you an adult when you turn 18? I just know he did it as soon as he was old enough to. 18 is still a teenager my friend

Update 4:

And, in my dad's defence, I'm pretty sure he got rid of it to avoid the whole Vietnam draft thing(that's my theory anyway, he's never told me why he did it)

12 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    No, none of that helps you, although your grandparents may be willing to sponsor you, which could help. You have to apply and go through the immigration process like anyone else wanting to live here.

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    It's kinda hilarious that as I sat down to type this, I've spilt milkshake down my top! Oh well! Was your father still a US citizen at the time of your birth? If so, you are a US citizen. If not, you are unable to claim US citizenship through your father. Do you have Well, I'm now off to a job interview as a weather forecaster.

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  • pk
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Look into N600K details.

    Research.

    Basically the N600K is where Grandparents step in for parents in terms of passing on U.S. citizenship.

    If your Father legally renounced his that is...

    Source(s): Oh. I just saw the draft dodger note. No. He's done. And he passed that bit onto you. Draft dodgers are permanently banned from obtaining citizenship. Sorry.
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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Was your father still a US citizen at the time of your birth? If so, you are a US citizen. If not, you are unable to claim US citizenship through your father. Do you have any siblings who were born in the United States or while your father was still a US citizen? If so, they can sponsor you for a Green Card once they turn 21. Unfortunately, your grandparents can not sponsor you for a permanent residence visa (Green Card).

    You are probably best off trying to get a work visa, through which you could eventually try to get a Green Card. Another option would be to marry a US citizen and have them sponsor you for a Green Card, but of course love is unpredictable. In the short term, you could consider studying in the US and getting a study visa, though that visa will expire once you graduate.

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  • Raelyn
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    If your dad renounced his US citizenship, then it is not possible for you to establish US citizenship through him. Having a US citizen grandparent does not help, except in cases in which the US citizen parent does not meet the residency requirement for passing on citizenship to a foreign-born child.

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    You have no entitlement to US citiznship

    There are basically NINE ways that you can get a visa to live and work in the US:

    (1) Marriage (or engagement in anticipation of marriage) to a US citizen.

    (2) You have skills that are in short supply in the US e.g. scientific or medical training. A degree is normally a must. Or you have superior specialist skills with at least 12 years experience. (H visas)

    (3) You have an Employer who is willing to transfer you - but even the employer has to make a good case for you - so you have to be a manager unless you fall under category (2) above.(L visas)

    (4) You may get a Green card in the diversity lottery (UK citizens, except N.Ireland, are not generally eligible unless you, your spouse or parents were born abroad or held a different citizenship.

    (5)You own or buy business (does not get you permanent resident status i.e. no green card)You must be a national of a qualifying Treaty countries. The business must have a minimum value of around $150k (more the better) bearing in mind you will need somewhere to live and with any startup business you will need at least 2 years living money as back up. So a figure of $350k would be a nearer minimum (E-2 visas)

    (6)You are an "investor" i.e. you have at least US $1m in assets to bring with you. half of that in a few areas. And your background will be investigated to the hilt. (EB-5 visas)

    (7)You have a close relative (mother, father, brother, sister and no further) who is an US citizen who would sponsor you, approx time this take 2-12 years?

    (8.The R1 visa is available to foreign members of religious denominations, having bona fide non-profit religious organizations in the U.S., for entering the U.S. to carry on the activities of a minister or religious worker as a profession, occupation or vocation

    (9)THE UNUSUAL You are in a position to claim refugee status/political asylum. or You get a member of Congress to sponsor a private bill with legislation that applies just to you.

    The S visa issued to persons who assist US law enforcement to investigate and prosecute crimes and terrorist activities such as money laundering and organized crime

    Recruitment agent will not take you seriously if you are not already in the US. Writing for jobs is really a waste of time; likewise US employers have no idea what foreign qualification are or mean (except Degrees) it may pay you to get your qualification translated into a US equivalent, there are Companies that do this (www.wes.org) ..

    But if you are getting a visa under (2) above then you need a job offer before you can get the visa. Your Employer will be your sponsor this will cost them upward of $5k. So you can see you have to be offering something really special to get considered They may also have to prove to the Dept of labor that there is no American who can do the job if the position is to be permanent ©

    DO NOT USE VISA CONSULTANTS

    follow the flow chart

    http://immigrationroad.com/green-card/immigration-...

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  • 7 years ago

    As I know if you are a green card holder in the US you may apply US CITIZENSHIP in a certain time of stay. Am a green card holder and we are planning to apply for US citizenship after our 5 years stay.

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    It's a good question Ricky, and my answer is: You have no entitlement to US citiznship Gotta catch the bus!

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  • 7 years ago

    I can't think of a single reason, not one, to p*ss the world's most desirable citizenship -- the US one -- down the toilet. Well, your dad did, and that closed the door for you once and for all. If he was my dad, I probably would never talk to him again.

    There was also no teenage rebellion involved, as only adults can renounce their US (or any other) US citizenship, for obvious reasons.

    Source(s): An immigrant from Europe, I live in the charming old mission town San Buenaventura and work as an attorney in Santa Barbara, California.
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  • 7 years ago

    did dad REALLY renounce his citizenship or is this just the version of life that has been passed down to you??

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