How would you translate "savor the day" into Latin?

Would "sapor diem" be correct?

Update:

Thanks! I am confused. Is there a subtle or substantial difference between resipio and suavitas?

Update 2:

Also I am looking at a play on words with carpe diem, so that expression will not fit this situation.

8 Answers

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  • Tom L
    Lv 7
    7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Using 'savor' as you have is a sense of the word that veers away from its main uses, and none of the Latin words that translate to 'savor' have followed the same path. I don't know of a Latin expression with the same connotation, but a literal version that fits better is:

    Fruare die

    The verb 'fruor' means to enjoy, to delight in, to relish. That seems to fit. Note that 'diem' has to be changed to 'die.' That loses the connection to 'carpe diem,' but that's the way the grammar works.

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Indeed "carpe diem" would be the usual equivalent, as a phrase commonly used in Latin. By 'savour' you mean 'taste' or 'get hold of the essence of' and similar. Never assume that a literal translation would have made sense to a Roman.

    And anyway, 'sapor' is a noun form, you were looking for a verb to correspond with 'savour'.

    "Resipio" is probably a verb form, though I don't know that particular verb. "Suavitas" is certainly a noun, meaning 'softness', 'gentleness', 'easy-going personality' and similar. The English adjective 'suave' comes from 'suavitas'.

    You really need to talk face to face with a Latin scholar for a good alternative to 'carpe diem'.

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  • 3 years ago

    Meaning Of Savor

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  • Dirac
    Lv 6
    7 years ago

    By savor is meant "to enjoy fully; to take lingering pleasure or delight in"; which is an extension of the literal meaning "to perceive with enjoyment (a scent or odour)."

    Latin has a verb "perfrui" meaning "to enjoy fully", but which has nothing to do with taste. You could say:

    "perfruere die" (not "diem"!) = enjoy fully the day

    A closer translation would require Latin to have a verb that has a similar meaning to "savor". I don't think there is one.

    (BTW forget "resipio". It means "to taste of", and, besides, the person who suggested it doesn't know how to conjugate verbs.The person who suggested "suavitas" doesn't know the difference between a verb and a noun.)

    Source(s): My profound knowledge of Latin
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  • 7 years ago

    "Carpe diem" means "seize the day," not "savor the day."

    "Sapor" is a noun, whereas the savor you want to use is a verb.

    The correct translation would be "Resipio Diem"

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  • 7 years ago

    Carpe diem means "enjoy the day" or "seize the day" savor the day is "Suavitas diem"

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Carpe diem. Surely you have heard this expression before?

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  • 7 years ago

    It has always been "carpe diem", from a poem by Horace.

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