How can I do better in algebra 2?

For some reason I was skipped algebra 1 and went straight into geometry. I got an A in that class no sweat. But Algebra 2 is murdering me slowly. I've been getting C's on my report cards in ONLY that class! And Im trying really hard to learn, but im so confused with most of the things my teacher starts to teach! And It doesn't help that she is horrible at explaining things.

And This is especially bad because I go to ECHS (early college high school) . I need to pass with B's atleast. Is there a website or program that can help me learn easier?

5 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Go to tutoring to master Algebra 1. Because you need Algebra 1 skills to do good in Algebra 2.

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  • luzell
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Completing the rectangular simply manner taking the primary two terms and making a ideal rectangular out of it. Consider concerning the pattern of the perfect square: (x + a)^2 = x^2 + 2ax + a^2 (x - a)^2 = x^2 - 2ax + a^2 First off, you'll be able to detect that the sign of the linear term tells you which one you are coping with. If the center term is negative, it's (x - a)^2. If positive, it's (x + a)^2. Additionally, notice that in both instances, the coefficient of the linear term is twice the rectangular root of the constant term. So: 1) n^2 + 16n - 7 = 0 We're coping with an (x + a)^2 drawback here, considering the fact that the 16n is constructive. So, from the pattern, n^2 + 2an + a^2 = zero n^2 + 16n + a^2 = 0 certainly, 2a is sixteen, so a = eight Now we need to therapeutic massage the equation into the right type. The ultimate rectangular can be n^2 + 16n + 64, but we've n^2 + 16n - 7. What can we must add to the equation to show -7 into +sixty four? Evidently, it is 71. So: n^2 + 16n - 7 = zero n^2 + 16n - 7 + 71 = zero + seventy one n^2 + 16n + 64 = 71 (n + 8)^2 = 71 Now we can resolve it: n + eight = +/- sqrt(71) (sqrt() = rectangular root) n = -8 +/- sqrt(71) 2) For this one, we have to get difficult. Each of the patterns involve a unary quadratic term - i.E. The coefficient of the squared time period must be 1. So, we by way of doing that: 3x^2 - 5x + 2 = zero x^2 - 5/three x + 2/3 = 0 Now: take 5/3 and cut it in half to get 5/6. Square that and get 25/36. So the superb square we want is x^2 - 5/3 x + 25/36 = (x - 5/6)^2 We ought to add anything to turn 2/3 into 25/36. 2/three = 24/36, so we have got to add 1/36. X^2 - 5/3x + 2/three + 1/36 = 1/36 x^2 - 5/3 x + 25/36 = 1/36 (x - 5/6)^2 = 1/36 x - 5/6 = +/- 1/6 x = 5/6 +/- 1/6 So, x = 1 or x = 4/6 = 2/3 Work the 1/3 one the equal approach as #2.

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  • Yuri
    Lv 5
    7 years ago

    Try the program "college algebra solved".

    http://www.blurb.com/b/4003195-math-english-gramma...

    Wikipedia: Metamemory, forgetting curve, Active recall, Anki, Spaced repetition, Spacing effect, Mnemonist, Skilled memory theory, Decay theory, Interference theory, Dual-coding theory

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  • 7 years ago

    Khan Academy all the way.

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