Question for vegans/vegetarians who think that humans should not eat meat because it's not natural?

Why do we have amino acids in our blood that assist specifically in breaking down proteins, oils, and fats? And why don't humans have a reaction to eating raw meat, like people who're lactose intolerant can't eat dairy because their ancestors weren't acclimatized to it? Me and people I know have... show more Why do we have amino acids in our blood that assist specifically in breaking down proteins, oils, and fats? And why don't humans have a reaction to eating raw meat, like people who're lactose intolerant can't eat dairy because their ancestors weren't acclimatized to it? Me and people I know have eaten raw meat quite a few times and it's fine, and we're quite fit and healthy and stay that way. The Japanese eat raw fish all the time, it's part of the national cuisine. Every society, prehistoric or modern, eats or has left evidence (in the form of spear and arrowheads and cracked bones, etc) that they ate animals, often raw.

If you're a vegan/vegetarian, but don't think it's unnatural to eat meat and have no problem with others doing it, I salute you good sir/ma'am. And I appreciate any answers I get.
Update: @ friendofchip: Which societies have been proven beyond a reasonable doubt to have not eaten any meat? I'm pretty sure that wholly vegan-vegetatian societies never existed, although there have been some, like the inuit, that survived almost entirely on meat.
Update 2: @ friendofchip: So you mean the communities within a society don't eat meat, similar to the vegetarian and vegan communities within today's societies. But not the society as a whole. About the enzymes in our blood - I should have mentioned that they seem to have evolved to break down *animal* fats, oils... show more @ friendofchip: So you mean the communities within a society don't eat meat, similar to the vegetarian and vegan communities within today's societies. But not the society as a whole.

About the enzymes in our blood - I should have mentioned that they seem to have evolved to break down *animal* fats, oils and proteins. We do have mechanisms for breaking down plant fats, oils and proteins, but as far as I can tell there's no evidence to support that the ones I mentioned are for breaking down anything other than other animals.
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