Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 7 years ago

If you were on welfare and you started working a second job..?

and you lost your government assistance because of the additional income would you keep the job even if it meant less money for your family and less time with your family?

Update:

I totally understand your issue of pride... but I work 6-7 days a week and 80+ hrs. My daughter misses me and I am missing out on home life. I would be okay with that if I had something to show for it but the second job I picked up is minimum wage and I would be better off financially if I didn't have it. At this point I'm tired and still broke and pride seems foolish. If I quit I would still keep searching for a better paying second job but I won't make the mistake of working minimum wage again.

Update 2:

The only reason I hesitate is pride. And it's kind of ironic since at this minimum wage job I am expected to alert a manager if I have to take a piss. I have never quit a job before without having something better before I did so but honestly welfare is a better deal than minimum wage.

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  • 7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Welfare includes more than cash assistance - like food stamps and medical assistance.

    Many people are better off on welfare than working.

    ~ ~

    The U.S. welfare system sure creates some crazy disincentives to working your way up the ladder. Benefits stacked upon benefits can mean it is financially better, at least in the short term, to stay at a lower-paying jobs rather than taking a higher paying job and losing those benefits. This is called the “welfare cliff.”

    Let’s take the example of a single mom with two kids, 1 and 4. She has a $29,000 a year job, putting the kids in daycare during the day while she works.

    As the above chart – via Gary Alexander, Pennsylvania’s secretary of Public Welfare — shows, the single mom is better off earning gross income of $29,000 with $57,327 in net income and benefits than to earn gross income of $69,000 with net income & benefits of $57,045.

    http://www.aei-ideas.org/2012/07/julias-mother-why...

    ~ ~

    How much doea a family of 3 receive on welfare?

    $21,996 per year.

    If she were working she would have to earn at least $30,000 per year - probably more.

    That is $14.40 per hour, plus full, employer paid medical insurance.

    ~ ~ ~

    There are a lot of variables.

    I choose Washington state, and have the children both under age five. The woman is paying $250 rent, and I did not count anything for HUD or section 8.

    I assumed that the woman lived with family members and paid them $250 rent and help with the untilities a little - maybe $50 per month.

    If she were getting housing help, it could easily increase another $5000 per year.

    If she were in a work program, she would have day care, and that would increase her welfare benefits.

    To keep it simple, I assumed the woman is claiming a disability and exempted from the work program.

    A family of three, with no income, would receive a monthly TANF grant of $478.

    http://www.dshs.wa.gov/onlinecso/tanf_su…

    Based on rent of $250…………….food stamps would be $526.00

    http://foodhelp.wa.gov/bf_benefit_estima…

    LIHEAP (energy assistance would be $1000 per year, $83.00 per month.

    http://www.liheap.ncat.org/profiles/WA.h…

    WIC (children to age 5) Washington average monthly benefit $41.64 x 2 = $83.28

    http://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/25wifyavgfd$.…

    The average cost of Medicaid for one adult and two children $663.66

    http://www.statehealthfacts.org/profilei…

    The total of these benefits is $1833 per month.

    Net of $21,996 per year.

    Someone earning $30,000 per year, (plus full medical insurance – employer paid), who nets 74% would have this income.

    ~ ~ ~

    ~ ~

    How much does it cost each person, each year, to pay for welfare?

    $1740.98 per year, for every man,woman, child in the United States.

    Since about 25% are on the receiving end, it is actually higher, for those paying.

    ~ ~ ~

    Consider first the total spent (not counting Social Security or Medicare):

    SSI – Supplemental security Income – not social security -for people who didn't work –

    $50 Billion a year.

    (see page 62 of the report)

    http://www.ssa.gov/oact/ssir/SSI11/ssi20…

    Medicaid ( not medicare) spending 2010 - $389 Billion:

    http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparem…

    Food stamps 2011 - $71 Billion:

    http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparet…

    TANF (cash assistance for families - federal funds) $21 Billion 2009

    http://archive.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofs/…

    (So I'm at $531 Billion a year (plus HUD, Energy, More).

    Figures for 2012 will be higher.

    Based on a population of 305 million, paying $531 Billion, is $1740.98 per person.

    Source(s): welfare worker
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  • 7 years ago

    Are you saying you were working one full-time job already and were on welfare? Something's wrong here. Either you are mixing up the facts or this country has a far bigger problem with poverty than I imagined.

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  • 7 years ago

    Yes, unless you have no personal pride, and are happy to live on welfare handouts for the rest of your life.

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  • Well, I rather be a real American, than to be a welfare leech. Would it kill any liberals to get off their lazy asses and go to work?

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Yes, i wouldn't want to be mistaken for a Democrat .........

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