Dual sport motorcycle a good starter bike?

I am 15 and looking for a starter motorcycle.

I have a driver's permit for a car and have passed the final driving test through driver's education. I also own a 110cc super pocket bike that I'm fixing up. It is not street worthy and needs a few parts (key start, kickstand, clutch cable, basic stuff) that I'm getting soon and should be learning on. It is far too low to take out and about, even if I made it street legal. My father used to ride motorcycles and between us we have go-peds (stand-up scooters) and go-ped karts (low-to-the-ground) in addition to the super pocket bike. I have no problems controlling any of these at 35+ mph and can ride a bicycle well. I am going to take the rider course for the endorsement and experience.

That being said, I need transportation to and from school. I stay after every day of the week and go to many weekend events, therefore need a reliable ride. The trip is about 10 miles each way. It would be very beneficial to be able to do highway speeds, as that is the most direct route. I live in an unpredictably rainy climate, but it generally does not rain more than once a month at the time I would be riding to and fro.

My main interest is dual sport bikes for lower insurance and the off-roading capabilities, but am open to other bikes. I was looking at the Suzuki DRZ-400S. The 250's seem a bit low-powered and I'm concerned about low maintainable speeds. I don't want to stress the bike.

The largest concern is that I'm a 5'6" female. I am rather strong, but if I dropped my bike (which I know I will) I need something I could pull up or not get trapped under. I can get and install a lowering kit. My father also needs to be able to comfortably ride, as I am planning to join the Air Force after college and ownership would go to him until I get back to the States. He's about 6' even.

So, is the DRZ400S a good starter, or will the higher seat height, decreased handling, and higher center of gravity make it tricky to learn? If not the DRZ, I'd probably have to go to the 250's, so what are my options there? Will any 250 be able to get up to highway and interstate speeds without breaking down? My budget is about 8,500 for the bike, any modifications (lowering if needed), gear, and accessories. Less would be better. The rest could go into savings, and that's never a bad thing.

Thanks.

Update:

I also have one of those small electric dirt bikes (15mph). I've had it close to 7 and 1/2 years now. Wiped out pretty badly a few years back and haven't crashed otherwise, but I've taken to being very cautious since then. I find it nearly brainlessly extremely easy to ride now.

12 Answers

Relevance
  • 7 years ago
    Best Answer

    A dual purpose is a great bike for a new rider however a 400 is a bit tall and heavy, my wife tried to ride my XL350 but it was just too big for her. I would consider a 250 ninja, its just as fast as 90% of the cruisers on the road and its a light easy handling bike.

  • 3 years ago

    I recommend one to visit this internet site where you can get quotes from the best companies: http://INSURECOMPAREQUOTES.US/index.html?src=2YAcu...

    RE :Dual sport motorcycle a good starter bike?

    I am 15 and looking for a starter motorcycle.

    I have a driver's permit for a car and have passed the final driving test through driver's education. I also own a 110cc super pocket bike that I'm fixing up. It is not street worthy and needs a few parts (key start, kickstand, clutch cable, basic stuff) that I'm getting soon and should be learning on. It is far too low to take out and about, even if I made it street legal. My father used to ride motorcycles and between us we have go-peds (stand-up scooters) and go-ped karts (low-to-the-ground) in addition to the super pocket bike. I have no problems controlling any of these at 35+ mph and can ride a bicycle well. I am going to take the rider course for the endorsement and experience.

    That being said, I need transportation to and from school. I stay after every day of the week and go to many weekend events, therefore need a reliable ride. The trip is about 10 miles each way. It would be very beneficial to be able to do highway speeds, as that is the most direct route. I live in an unpredictably rainy climate, but it generally does not rain more than once a month at the time I would be riding to and fro.

    My main interest is dual sport bikes for lower insurance and the off-roading capabilities, but am open to other bikes. I was looking at the Suzuki DRZ-400S. The 250's seem a bit low-powered and I'm concerned about low maintainable speeds. I don't want to stress the bike.

    The largest concern is that I'm a 5'6" female. I am rather strong, but if I dropped my bike (which I know I will) I need something I could pull up or not get trapped under. I can get and install a lowering kit. My father also needs to be able to comfortably ride, as I am planning to join the Air Force after college and ownership would go to him until I get back to the States. He's about 6' even.

    So, is the DRZ400S a good starter, or will the higher seat height, decreased handling, and higher center of gravity make it tricky to learn? If not the DRZ, I'd probably have to go to the 250's, so what are my options there? Will any 250 be able to get up to highway and interstate speeds without breaking down? My budget is about 8,500 for the bike, any modifications (lowering if needed), gear, and accessories. Less would be better. The rest could go into savings, and that's never a bad thing.

    Thanks.

    Update: I also have one of those small electric dirt bikes (15mph). I've had it close to 7 and 1/2 years now. Wiped out pretty badly a few years back and haven't crashed otherwise, but I've taken to being very cautious since then. I find it nearly brainlessly extremely easy to ride now.

    Follow 9 answers

  • John R
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    The DRZ 400 is a good bike, but it is on the heavy side.

    A nice 250 dual sport will fit your needs perfectly. They are light, yet heavy enough to be stable on the road. They have good power, but not too much power. Plates and insurance are low. Your fuel economy would be really good (usually around 70mpg).

    I used to own a Honda XL 250 in the mid 1980's. It was a really good reliable bike. It even had enough power for me to ride with a passenger, my girlfriend with me at the time (now my wife). The bike got stolen or I would probably still have it today.

    Just make sure you purchase a Japanese or European bike. Do not get the Chinese knock off's that have invaded our shores. They are not up to the quality or craftsmanship of the bikes they are cloned from.

    Get the 250 dual sport.

    http://powersports.honda.com/dual-sport/2013/crf25...

    http://www.suzukicycles.com/Product%20Lines/Cycles...

    http://www.yamaha-motor.com/sport/products/modelho...

    http://www.kawasaki.com/Products/product-specifica...

    http://www.ktm.com/us/enduro/350excfusa/highlights...

    http://husqvarna-motorcyclesna.com/product.php?pid...

    Source(s): Riding and racing since 1973. Ex-Honda/Yamaha mechanic.
  • 7 years ago

    The DRZ400 is a good bike for dual sport and learning.

    You can lower it while learning and on the street.

    I like the Honda 250 dual sport too. They have more power than you might think

    and are safe and light weight.

    You are tall enough that either will work for you.

    Your experience will grow and so will your confidence.

    Good Luck !

    Be safe.

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    My first bike was Yamaha TT-R. I have been riding motorcycles for 3 years and within those years, I still prefer yamaha bikes over others. My friend has a DRZ400S. He bought it last year. It's good. I tried it once. If you are looking for Suzuki DRZ-400S, try to check everything before purchasing it. I haven't tried suzuki so I guess, you need to check its engines first.

    Source(s): Jafrum
  • 7 years ago

    I think it depends on your long term riding goals. A dual sport will be a poor choice if you mean to transition to sportbikes in the future, as the handling mechanics and seating position will be very different. If you plan to ride more standard bikes, though, you should be OK.

    250s are by no means low powered and are very nimble. You won't be passing at triple digits on the highway, but no car short of a Ferrari will take you at a stoplight, and an experienced rider on a 250 can lay waste to a less experienced rider on a literbike in the twisties. The 250s have great riding mechanics. Plus they're inexpensive and have great resale value when you're ready to move on.

    Source(s): Motorcycle rider since 2007. Former Ninja 250 owner.
  • 7 years ago

    It is alot of bike for a total beginner, but not out of the question and has so many pluses that it's a serious consideration. Maybe a month or two on a 250 would be a good idea first.

  • Rouvin
    Lv 6
    3 years ago

    I suggest one to visit this web site where you can compare quotes from the best companies: http://COVERAGEFINDER.NET/index.html?src=5YAxnu68u...

    RE :Dual sport motorcycle a good starter bike?

    I am 15 and looking for a starter motorcycle.

    I have a driver's permit for a car and have passed the final driving test through driver's education. I also own a 110cc super pocket bike that I'm fixing up. It is not street worthy and needs a few parts (key start, kickstand, clutch cable, basic stuff) that I'm getting soon and should be learning on. It is far too low to take out and about, even if I made it street legal. My father used to ride motorcycles and between us we have go-peds (stand-up scooters) and go-ped karts (low-to-the-ground) in addition to the super pocket bike. I have no problems controlling any of these at 35+ mph and can ride a bicycle well. I am going to take the rider course for the endorsement and experience.

    That being said, I need transportation to and from school. I stay after every day of the week and go to many weekend events, therefore need a reliable ride. The trip is about 10 miles each way. It would be very beneficial to be able to do highway speeds, as that is the most direct route. I live in an unpredictably rainy climate, but it generally does not rain more than once a month at the time I would be riding to and fro.

    My main interest is dual sport bikes for lower insurance and the off-roading capabilities, but am open to other bikes. I was looking at the Suzuki DRZ-400S. The 250's seem a bit low-powered and I'm concerned about low maintainable speeds. I don't want to stress the bike.

    The largest concern is that I'm a 5'6" female. I am rather strong, but if I dropped my bike (which I know I will) I need something I could pull up or not get trapped under. I can get and install a lowering kit. My father also needs to be able to comfortably ride, as I am planning to join the Air Force after college and ownership would go to him until I get back to the States. He's about 6' even.

    So, is the DRZ400S a good starter, or will the higher seat height, decreased handling, and higher center of gravity make it tricky to learn? If not the DRZ, I'd probably have to go to the 250's, so what are my options there? Will any 250 be able to get up to highway and interstate speeds without breaking down? My budget is about 8,500 for the bike, any modifications (lowering if needed), gear, and accessories. Less would be better. The rest could go into savings, and that's never a bad thing.

    Thanks.

    Update: I also have one of those small electric dirt bikes (15mph). I've had it close to 7 and 1/2 years now. Wiped out pretty badly a few years back and haven't crashed otherwise, but I've taken to being very cautious since then. I find it nearly brainlessly extremely easy to ride now.

    Follow 10 answers

    Source(s): I suggest one to visit this web site where you can compare quotes from the best companies: http://COVERAGEFINDER.NET/index.html?src=5YAxnu68u...
  • 7 years ago

    If you want speed and great handling get a used Harley-Davidson Sportster. Small frame and a big engine makes for quite an impressive amount of speed for a cruiser and they can turn on a dime. And since it is a cruiser it will have a lower seat contributing to greater stability, which seems to be one your concerns.

    Let me confirm this 250's are not capable of reaching highway speeds at least not 250 cruisers. If you wish to go on the highways you will need at least 600ccs or greater. Which is why i think a sportster would be good for you. Any recent Sportster will either have a 883cc engine or a 1200cc engine. And Harley engine produce great amounts of torque. So with a Harley have no fear about highways. But it's your choice, that's just my 2 cents.

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    constantly checking to the condition your auto by checking your current car's occasion air force, it will improve your current gasoline conjumpsion by at the least several percent. To have a very greater engine performance clean your air intake filter. This specific simple process can improve your gasoline consumption by simply percent. Another option is always to convert your can owning on hydrogen gas. merely two. Use Water to power your motor vehicle.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.