US Government Question (Suppose that two different groups of presidential electors each claim that they have.)?

Suppose that two different groups of presidential electors each claim that they have been lawfully elected and represent a state, and each group sends its votes for president and vice-president to Congress. What happens next?

a. That state's electoral votes are ignored and if a majority of the electoral college is no longer possible the president is elected by the House of Representatives-one vote per state-and the vice-president is elected by the U.S. Senate.

b. The state assembly and the state senate convene separately and vote on which group of electors to recognize. If they do not agree, then the governor decides.

c. The U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate convene separately and vote on which group of votes to recognize. The House and Senate must agree. If they do not agree, then the votes of the electors whose appointment is certified by the executive of the State (the governor) are the ones to be counted.

d. The governor schedules a special election.

e. The U.S. Supreme Court decides which group is the lawful group.

2 Answers

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  • 8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    The one certified by the states secretary of state get to go in.

  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    not sure I think the state or congress has to decide

    that is house of Rep ratify the vote

    it is YOUR homework

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