Arrested for recording Hawthorne Police, Does it appear this person was breaking the Law, Recording is Legal?

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bILLwOslvbs

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&feature=plcp

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Which one of his actions made what he was doing illegal at the time of arrest?

Update:

First Circuit

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("[A] citizen's right to film government officials, including law enforcement officers, in the discharge of their duties in a public space is a basic, vital, and well-established liberty safeguarded by the First Amendment.");

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Furthermore, the United States Department of Justice has openly stated its position that the First Amendment protects all U.S. citizens who record the activities of the police in public, and has intervened in at least one civil rights lawsuit against police officers to support that First Amendment right. See Sharp v. Baltimore City Police Dep't, No. 1:11-cv-02888-BEL (D. Md. Statement of Interest filed January 10, 2012).

3 Answers

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  • dooopo
    Lv 6
    7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    I don't get how they get away with arresting. I know some times they claim your interfering with their investigation or other bs they pull out of their rear. Look at how many homes and stores that have cams on the out side for security reasons. The cams view cops all the time yet they cant do a thing about it or at least don't try yet some one could have a hand held cam and get arrested.

  • 7 years ago

    I was having trouble understanding the officer when he first approached the videographer so if he articulated the reason for the arrest, I missed it. Just based on what I saw in the video, this looks more like a failure to provide ID issue than a shooting video of the police issue. As is a problem with many of these type videos, we haven't seen what happened before the camera starts rolling. Was there any interaction with the officers before this? Was the videographer somehow a party to the stop or a genuine third party? What is California law on providing ID?

    This is a previous answer on that subject, I can't vouch for its accuracy.

    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200607...

    The charges, if there were any, were likely the ever popular resisting, or delaying an officer charge.

    Good luck and hope this helps.

  • 7 years ago

    It's illegal to photograph or videotape an officer of the law without their written permission.

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