Question for American Jews (especially those in Southern states)?

I am curious how American Jews, especially those living in Southern states or with southern backgrounds feel about the confederate flag. Many see it as a sign of oppression and many see it as a sign of southern pride. How do you see it? A little bit of both? A sign of times gone by that should be retired? I flag that represents something different now than it did in 1860? I am just curious. Do you ever find yourself in conflict with a Southern heritage and a Jewish faith or are they totally compatible? Also....if you live in the South, has your family lived in the south for generations or are you new to a southern urban area?

If you don't have anything meaningful to say, just don't bother. Bashing Jews or bashing southerners is not new and not witty and I am sure anything you can say is going to be old and stale. I am interested in real answers with real explanations

Thanks!

Update:

@Julia--I can take the rough with the smooth. I read the three answers I got on this so far and all were trolls. I just try to say to people "You are not bothering me". You wasted your time answering but I guess you get the two points anyway huh? LOL

Update 2:

@Genegee- I selected religious Jews that live in the South, I don't care where in the South. I am an Israeli American Orthodox Jew and this came up because I am watching a civil war documentary. My question remains the same. How Jews living in the South view the stars and bars? Not all Jews living in the South are from the North but yes, many are. The question still remains the same, "How do Jews living in the South view the confederate flag? I do not have problems with the flag. It is not my flag. I currently live in Chicago. I am asking a question. I didn't need nor want a lecture and I didn't need a geography lesson. The question remains the same. I addressed it to Southern Jews because Southern Jews will see the flag MUCH more than rest of the country AND the flag can mean nothing more than southern pride to some people. I simply wanted to know how each person viewed it. If you didn't want to answer, then you should have just scrolled on by. We all know the fla

Update 3:

@Lucy-Very true!

@Vern7us (you have a most interesting user name btw)-That is interesting. I assumed some people did fly it out of a heritage issue and not out of hate. I don't know much about it (hence my question I guess). Unlike what Genegee implied, I really don't have any preconceived notions about it.

Update 4:

The variety of the non-troll questions I am getting are interesting. So some do fly it for southern pride that has nothing to do with what it stood for in 1860 but some also fly it as a sign of hate. I wonder if there has ever been a poll taken of this. Its interesting. No Jew I am know would support slavery, that goes without saying but I have read some use it also as a sign of "states rights" while many as a sign of heritage. That is interesting

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  • 7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Sigh. Well, we know any question in Yahoo is more likely than not going to be abused by lowbrow bigots to disrupt the question, and having pointed out *that* obvious fact, I'll just dismiss their idiocy as the result of ignorance and a dysfunctional life and try to take pity on them.

    As to the Confederate flag..I do not like it. It does still represent the attitudes of the confederate mind set and it is used by groups and individuals who hold those and also by groups and individuals for the purpose of intimidation. I've witnessed that many times in my 54 years and not all of it in my childhood in the 1960's. I do not see it as a part of "my" heritage since my family arrived in the south after the Confederacy and those who use it and display it are so very often bigots. My maternal Grandmother was born in the south in the late 1800's and my son is a fourth generation Southern American Jew. We don't display a confederate flag and won't because it is still often used to intimidate and ally the one displaying it to bigoted ideals and groups. I've had discussions about this with other Southern Jews in person on more than one occasion and distaste for the Confederate flag is the consensus in every conversation I've had. When these discussions involved Jewish youth (teens and young adults) *Some* younger Jews appeared not to know that it was associated with bigotry. Thankfully, they had not encountered open attacks from people who used that symbolism, but others had witnessed it.

    Also a reminder:

    Southern heritage does not have to equate to the bigotry of the Old South. My heritage in the South goes back more than 130 years on my maternal side and about 90 years on my paternal side. My grandparents on both sides lived in the South and lived in a manner to promote respect and tolerance. We have lived surrounded by non Jews.. of course primarily Southern White and Protestant..and not only gotten along with our neighbors, but often found among them our closest friends that of course, were not bigots. My family has had friends of every race and religion. Many Southern Jews have a longstanding heritage of livng in a manner to stand for civil rights and equality. Jews were at the forefront of the civil rights movement alongside our black brothers and sisters and members of the NAACP. Jews were lynched alongside blacks in freedom rides and marches. My father refused to eat at any lunch counter that would not permit his black employee to sit with him at lunch..this was before that famed boycott. He had many meals on the road in the truck or in the back kitchens of restaurants with the blacks rather than to give up his ethics. THAT is MY Southern heritage and one I'm proud to pass along to my son.

    Southern bigotry existed and still exists but sadly..I believe was often exaggerated to be exclusively a Southern thing because some of the worst bigots I've ever known MOVED here from the North (especially Illinois and Michigan) because they wrongly believed their bigotry would be perfectly acceptable and were often shocked to discover that contrary to stereotype, not all southerners appreciate bigots.I do not believe that bigotry is exclusive to the south or that it is even more pervasive here than in the North since most of the worst bigots I've known were born in the NORTH not the South.

    Bigotry is despicable no matter what geographic region it comes from.

    There is much to love about the South and much to need improvement like ANYWHERE else.

    What I love about *my* Southern heritage is that Southern people overall really are more polite, more concerned about teaching our children manners, civility, and respect for others. We still say m'aam and sir and please and thank you. We still hold doors open for one another and we still wave to people as they drive by and we still smile and say hello to strangers.

    Shalom y'all!

    edit: My husband and I know a few *non Jews* who are not bigots themselves but refuse to acknowledge that the Confederate flag represents hate. They claim to display it to honor ancestors. I think they’re in denial but that’s not my issue.

    And a reminder to correct another here....Jews are not a race. The REASON Jews have always been at the forefront of civil rights issues and against racism is because the Torah teaches us all humans are equal before God and Jews have been a multi-racial and interracial people since before the Exodus. Am Yisrael Chai! May Israel stay strong and prevail against the evil set upon her.

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  • 4 years ago

    I say HURRAY to the government of Arizona. I do not know where you are from, but you probably do not deal with the ILLEGAL ALIENS in the same way the people of Arizona must. They do not have the dollars to feed, house, educate, medicate and provide all the services required for these people. I think all the states should pass this same set of laws. Considering the FEDS are not ready to enforce the laws the state must take care of themselves . I read somewhere that BO has 214 billion dollars set aside to give to Mexico to help the Police Departments. That is a joke, considering the drug cartels, from Columbia, run the country, and this did not happen over night, Why aren't the police doing the job? If they need help, God knows, if the people who are leaving would stand up for themselves and fight for their country, oh by the way, the way the Americans did at the Alamo, they would not be in this country. HURRAY TO ARIZONA By the way the statement about Nazi Germany The jews were there shop keepers, shoe repair, jewelers and many kinds of business. People who were making and spending money not a burden on the rest of the people and spoke the same language.

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    I shudder at it. Not for being Jewish, but for it's connection with slavery. I don't see it often, and when I do I KNOW those posting it feel pride in their heritage, rightly so. (Every group's made mistakes & the south did get the short end of the stick at points.)

    Then again, I'm a transplanted northerner. Even after many years, I don't think I've grown the necessary southern roots to count here. I've known & dated southerners. None have talked about the flag, but each has had pride in their southern-ness, which I've come to appreciate.

    However it's nothing compared to the flag for my state - now that's one ugly flag - and it's flying around here everywhere!

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  • Chaya
    Lv 6
    7 years ago

    My father's family was one of the early settlers in Texas before it was a state. They voted against secession. One of the first things I noticed moving "up North" was the lack of the Confederate flag on pick up trucks, etc., and it was a relief. Yay. I associate it with White Supremacy, KKK, and every bad 'decadent South' stereotype. I am from a cosmopolitan urban area in the south where confederate flags have been frowned upon since my first memories in school. Some places in the deep South they are more friendly toward that flag than others. Neo-confederacy was primarily a rural or biker minority phenomenon you would see with swastika tatoos when I was growing up, but is becoming fashionable and more prevalent among the Ultra-conservative religious right. I saw one of them with a swastika tatoo as a patient/client the other day. The Christian nurse was as wary of the guy as me, though. We went into the room together.

    The Neo-Confederates who wave the Rebel flags are repugnant because they are usually aligned with Neo-Nazis, Skinheads and White Supremecists. Sadly, they have also made in-roads into the Republican party and conservative Christian organizations. They stand for "traditional" women's roles and are basically reactionary. The organizations they represent are League of the South and the Mises Institute,http://www.splcenter.org/blog/2011/02/09/ron-paul-... which advocates "Austrian" style economics. Most states in the South have taken the Confederate flag out of their state flags as a matter of conscience and solidarity with the US. Alabama and Florida may still have it.

    There is a flip side universe "up North", the hyper Yank, who still hates ALL Southerners for seceding (without bothering to find out where we stand) and take every opportunity to call Southerners stupid. I heard this from newscasters and weathermen up North! They are every bigoted thing the Neo-Con skin heads are, but just wearing a different sweater. They might as well be flying the Bigoted Flag on the back of their SUVs to match the Confederate flag on their dopplegongers'.

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  • robb
    Lv 6
    7 years ago

    I'm not Jewish ( although my beliefs lean in that direction) but I am a Southerner. The Confererate flag is a symbol of our heretige and I belive most who fly it do so for that reason. I am also aware that certain unsavory characters have used it as a symbol of hate. I would never fly that flag because I am aware that it is offensive to some but I support the rights of those who wish to. I suspect much of the hate associated with the flag is the result of events that happened in the years following the war.

    One thing that concers me is that people tend to rewrite history. There is a certain author that has written a book about growing up black in the deep south in the 60's and 70's. I vividly remember crossing paths with her some 40 years ago when she was a young girl, maybe in her early teens. I know the area she grew up in, I knew the stories about her family, and I knew several of the people she alluded to in her book. I'm not saying she had it easy, in fact I am sure that she didn't, but much of the "oppression" in her book was a fabrication. I have family who worked in the same fields under the same conditions as her family.

    I have had family in the south since the 1790's and in Alabama since the 1840's-50's.

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  • Aravah
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    answer: I do view it as part of my heritage, like the Scottish and English flags. Do I agree with everything the Southern states did in the past? No. Does every American agree with everything the US has done? No. Right in the front of those marches for equality and an end to segregation were Jews from the north and south.

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  • 7 years ago

    when i look at that flag there is always the saying right under it "heritage not hate" but the truth of the matter is that it is a heritage of hate. i have always noticed that whoever has flown that flag has always been full of hate and rebellion. i lived in the south for a number of years and they are still mad that the north won the war. they fly that flag out of rebelliousness and not because of their heritage.

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  • 7 years ago

    Feivel, these people are mean-spirited and arrogant and unfortunately, most of what passes for answers here is just spiteful crap about Jews and Israel - mention Judaism or Israel and it's like waving a red flag in front of a bull.

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  • 7 years ago

    You selected the Jewish race that live in the south as to how they feel about Southern Heritage. To begin with the second largest group of jewish people in the United States lives in Florida and if you know anything about the East coast of Florida we residence used to call it New York South. What l am telling you is that most of the jewish population that currently live in the South are from the north.

    Now if you want to talk about the Civil War and what part the Jewish people played in it ask that question. If you have problems. With the flag again that is your problem. Yes l would be the first to say that it was used inappropriately by some groups of people.

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    At the end of the day, it's just a flipping flag

    Dude you're asking to be trolled if you can't take the rough with the smooth

    What I'm saying is you're encouraging trolls by asking them not to troll, it's red rag to a bull

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