Why does the dominant arm produce more muscle force than the non-dominant arm for the same EMG levels?

Why does the dominant arm produce more muscle force than the non-dominant arm for the same EMG levels? For example, for the dominant forearm at around .709 mV, there was a force of 215kg, while for the dominant forearm at .709 mV, the force was at 260kg... how can the same amount of electrical activity produce such different forces? Is it because of more action potential firing? But wouldn't that INCREASE the levels of EMG? Please help!

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    The muscles of the dominant arm are more "trained" than those of the non-dominant. You could notice it yourself that you have to use less power to lift something with your dominant arm. You need less energy for it. Put the same energy in a dominant arm can lift more than with the non dominant arm. To lift the same weight you need more energy in the non dominant arm.

    Source(s): Domination for Dummies
  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Yep. Completely. I am totally right handed and yet, I lift the exact same on both arms and I ended up with my left bicep much larger than my right. However, weird thing is, my forearm muscles in my right arm are bigger. But, my husband said it's not a noticeable difference, but I can tell.

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