Don R
Lv 4
Don R asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 8 years ago

Who coined the phrase "first kill all the lawyers"? and did he have politicians in mind?

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  • 8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    It is from Shakespeare's 'Henry VI'. Given its context in the play, the line could be interpreted as applying to politicians.

  • Andy F
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    It's from Shakespeare. The line is from Henry VI, Part II, Act 4, Scene 2.

    It's uttered by "Dick the Butcher," a supposed supporter of Jack Cade's Rebellion.

    Historically Jack Cade's Rebellion was an actual lower-class revolt against the corruption of King Henry VI's government -- and yes, it was targeted largely at politicians -- that occurred in England in 1450, mostly among the peasants, small shopkeepers and other poor people of Kent.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Cade

    There's a lot of debate over how Shakespeare wanted us to interpret Dick the Butcher's call to kill all lawyers.

    Many think Shakespeare was echoing the justified frustration among common people with the deviousness and corruption of the law profession. After all, he has Hamlet complain about "the law's delay, and the proud man's contumely," and maybe he's saying the same thing here.

    However, many lawyers argue that Shakespeare, who was generally unsympathetic to revolution, used the line to illustrate the destructiveness of Cade's Rebellion. Lawyers are crucial guardians of law & order in society, the argument goes, and Cade & Dick the Butcher want to eliminate them so Cade & Co. could make a play for power.

  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    no, no, to the present day everyone is going to have sex with whom you have to kill, did not you know? was killed and never in their lives to open up their A_ss_and love, to love and cherish forever.

  • It's a quote from Shakespear's Henry the Sixth

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  • 8 years ago

    I think your quote is not exactly correct. But it came from a line in a Shakespeare play.

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