Sophie asked in EnvironmentGlobal Warming · 7 years ago

what about global warming makes malaria more common?

so its ma hwk thanks

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  • 7 years ago
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    One of the problems with our media is the fact that most journalists are graduates in humanities and have no scientific background. This becomes a problem when people report science - the mainstream media have a tendency to present everything related to global warming as having equal scientific weight.

    What has this got to do with your question? Well, it's important to differentiate between the science of climatology and predictions based on that science. Unfortunately many people tend to lump everything they hear into 'proof of global warming' without understanding the reasoning behind it.

    The concensus of the world's scientific community is that our planet is warming and emissions of greenhouse gases by human activities is responsible. What our governments and policy-makers have to do is decide what the consequences will be and that means making assessments based on predictions and what-we-currently-know.

    What we knew was that mosquitos are cold blooded and prefer temperatures above 80 F. If the global temperature increased, even slightly, then people suggested this might mean that malaria-carrying mosquitos could spread into regions that were relatively free of them beforehand. This was a worry based on what we knew at the time. We started to find that the reality is often much more complicated than we initially thought - the parasite causing malaria might develop faster in higher temperatures. This would mean that a mosquito becomes infectious quicker and the ability of the mosquito to transmit would increase. So warming might increase the occurance of malaria because the parasite develops quicker and because the mosquitos start to move into previously malaria-free areas.

    More recently, research is showing that higher temperatures do cause the parasite to develop faster but it also reduces how infectious they are: http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/8/3...

    This might mean that warming might reduce the ability of malaria to spread! So whether malaria becomes more common as a result of global warming is something we still don't know sufficiently well because we're still trying to understand the effects of temperature. But, that shouldn't stop us planning on the basis of what we currently know and changing our views based on the evidence available if we have to.

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  • 7 years ago

    Deniers like jim like to pretend they are scientists but clearly have little real understanding of the subject.

    For a start the mosquito is not a tropical creature, it is found in most of the world with the exception of the Antarctic. Malaria was certainly more wide spread in the past as stagnant water was a breading ground for Mosquito's as in the case of the Canadian outbreak (which was in the 1800's) probably brought in by infected British soldiers coming from India.

    Malaria has indeed become pretty much a none issue out side the tropics because of chemicals like DDT, but here the problem in the tropics mosquito's can breed year round and the problem has never been able to be completely stopped. In temperate regions it can be stopped because the breeding cycle is far more seasonal, warm the world up a few degrees and the regions where mosquito's can breed year round will expand and of course malaria is not the only illness mosquito's can carry.

    Deniers would rather rant about conspiracies than face facts !

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaria#History

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosquito#Distribution

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  • 7 years ago

    Malaria has a small relationship to climate; yes indeed, it needs mosquitoes to be spread and mosquitoes do better in warm climates.....but A does not equal B.

    Malaria is a public health issue and is eradicated by proper precautions. I have lived in the Caribbean most of the last 40 years, on islands where 20 to 40 percent of the population used to die in a malaria outbreak, and there hasn't been a hundred cases in the Caribbean in those 40 years. ( and the temperature hasn't dropped ).

    Except in Haiti. Where malaria is a failure of Public Health, not air temperature.

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Although there are a number of factors, global warming is bring heat to higher elevations, exposing maybe 2 billion more people to both malaria and dengue fever which is also carried by mosquitoes. More rain in some areas also may leave pools of water where mosquitoes can do their breeding.

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  • 7 years ago

    Global Warming makes Malaria {less} common; As the world gets hotter and hotter the water holes and ponds dry out and the Mosquitoes have no place to breed,Wallah! no Malaria carrying Mosquitoes. Make sense?

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  • 7 years ago

    It doesn't. Dr. Paul Reiter, a world-renowned expert in the field, resigned from the IPCC over that organization's insistence on making unsubstantiated claims about how global warming would spread malaria. Among other things, he said...

    "...the treatment of this issue by the IPCC was ill-informed, biased, and scientifically unacceptable."

    "After careful review of the pronouncements the Health chapter in Working Group II the IPCC Second Assessment, it is my opinion that that they were not based on authentic science."

    "My colleague and I repeatedly found ourselves at loggerheads with persons who insisted on making authoritative pronouncements, although they had little or no knowledge of our specialty."

    "..the IPCC has done a disservice to society by relying on "experts" who have little or no knowledge of the subject, and allowing them to make authoritative pronouncements that are not based on sound science. In truth, the principal determinants of transmission of malaria and many other mosquito-borne diseases are politics, economics and human activities. "

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  • Maxx
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Just so you know... advocates of man-made Global Warming RULE on this site and they will thumb-down and HIDE this answer very quickly. And all other answers from skeptics as well, so be sure to look at the hidden answers, that's where the truth is.

    No... for two reasons.

    First reason:

    Mosquitoes Ignore Global Warming Predictions

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/jamestaylor/2011/10/05...

    Second reason:

    There is no man-made Global Warming, see what the experts say:

    The Great Global Warming Swindle

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ov0WwtPcALE

    Youtube thumbnail

    Global Warming Doomsday Called Off

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr5O1HsTVgA

    Youtube thumbnail

    &playnext=1&list=PLC012004CB098DE90&fe

    -----------------------

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  • 7 years ago

    Wow have you ever gone out of your mind.

    Malaria has been a curse for generations. It wasn't until DDT was developed to combat Malaria down in the construction of the Panama Canal that Malaria was almost eradicated. When President Nixon formed the EPA he installed William Ruckleshaus as its first head. One of his first acts was to ban DDT. The reaoning for this was, "If I can get DDT banned, there isn't anything I can't get banned." A book by Rachel Carlson was written named Silent Spring was the scientific blame. Rachel's proclamation that DDT made Robin's eggs soft had since been proven utterly false.

    Now Malaria is again on the rise and there is nothing to fight it with. DDT has been outlawed by the UN. So unmistakably, the blood of every innocent person who dies of Malaria is on the hands of the environmental movement not on Global Warming. Just think of all the pain and suffering that has resulted in Ruckelshaus' power trip.

    The bed bug infestation is of epidemic proportion in the hotels of New York. The exterminators all agree that they really have nothing sufficient to eradicate them without DDT.

    So believe what you want but check out the facts first. Accurate history is hard to find. But it is worth it.

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  • oikoσ
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    The mosquitoes (Anopheles) that carry the parasite live in warm climates.

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  • JimZ
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Malaria is bad and it scares people. We have in this country and this world for that matter, those who have no problems using junk science to push their anti-profit, anti-corporation and anti-freedom political agenda. One of the worst outbreaks of malaria was in Siberia long before CO2 was used to push a political agenda. If they can use it, no matter how ridiculous or unfounded, they will. They proved that.

    http://climateaudit.org/2005/08/30/mosquitos-malar...

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