Should I be skeptical about this HIV vaccine research study?

Ok so I'm attending this paid ongoing HIV vaccine reaearch study to see if the vaccine helps to PREVENT HIV. It is an ongoing study that will last for 5 years and is paid for each visit. I have not received the first vaccine shot yet until the third visit which is on Monday. I can stop participating anytime I like. NOW here's the skeptical part.... The vaccine produces HIV antibodies which an HIV test cannot detect whether it is real HIV or the antibodies so a test will still show as positive even if I'm not really positive(the lady kept assuring me that the vaccine does not create HIV in my body). Second the government who is paying for this has access to these records at anytime. Third the vaccine produces some uncomfortable side effects. I get paid about 85 my next visit. So should I be worried? Or is it a good idea to continue?

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  • ~qx~
    Lv 7
    7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Do some research regarding how the government has handled disease research in the past, the most notorious of which is the Tuskagee Syphyllis Study.

    Your tax $ at work ...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuskegee_syphilis_exp...

    http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/features/2002/...

    http://www.cdc.gov/tuskegee/timeline.htm

    If you are feeling uneasy about participating in this study, you have a good reason to. Good luck.

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  • 7 years ago

    One possible benefit to you could be getting a vaccine that protects you from HIV. Or you could get the placebo. Or it could be as unprotective as previous vaccine attempts. For research purposes you should engage in risky behavior to put that vaccination to a good test. For your own safety, and the safety of those around you, you should not.

    The HIV antibody test has been a favorite screening test, which would probably become useless for you if the vaccine causes a positive. They will probably periodically do other tests like HIV RNA to see if you might be infected. With new at-home rapid tests for antibody, you might find that some enchanted evening becomes a disappointment when your date is not convinced it is just the experimental vaccine causing the positive. These kits might allow you to cheat and discover if you got the placebo.

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Hey Daniel. In the interest of full disclosure, I work for the HIV Vaccine Trials network that is doing the preventive HV vaccine study you've enrolled in. First let me thank you for being willing to volunteer for such an important study. I don't know which of the 21 sites you've enrolled at since that information is confidential but I do know that compensation is kept low at the sites and usually just covers travel expenses so I know you are doing it out of the goodness of your heart and to help find a vaccine to stop the spread of HIV. Thanks!

    A lot of educaiton happens before anyone enrolls in a trial so you realize that the vaccines used do not conatain any HIV so it is impossible to become infected by it. Small pieces of DNA and/or proteins are artifically made to try to fool your body into believing its seen HIV with the hope that your body will produce antibodies or other cells that could fight HIV if you ever were exposed to it. As you said above, a standard HIV test looks for these antibodies so you may get a positive result from this test but follow up tests that are more sophisticated would show that a vaccine trial participant was not infect. If you are still concerned about this or any potential side effects then make sure to discuss this with the clinical staff you see before receiving any vaccinations. You can decide to withdraw from a trial at any time.

    One other point I'm sure they stressed at the site was that you need to continue to keep yourself safe from possible infection as you may be recieving a placebo and even if you are getting the vaccine, we do not know if it works to prevent infection. Each visit you will get condoms, lubricant, and state of the art prevention counseling. A particiapant's safety always comes before research and any research questions we are asking! If you or any friends want to find out more about the trial, they can go to http://hopetakesaction.org/about/index.html for more detailed answers and of course, call your research site and set up an additional appointment to ask those questions any time you would like. Personally, I'm looking forward to the day we can stop the spread of HIV once and for all so again, thanks for volunteering ! Yours, Jmi

    Source(s): http://hopetakesaction.org/about/index.html Site is maintained by the HIV Vaccine Trials Network.
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  • 7 years ago

    If you want to do it then do it but keep in mind any day they can tell u "oh sorry the test went wrong you have HIV now" and there will be nothing u can do about it cuz you volunteered for it but at the same time it can go well and nothing can happen its basically up to you

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  • 7 years ago

    85 what? i know it's for a good cause but dude...

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