My science teacher doesn't acknowledge evolution?

It doesn't make sense to her because she thinks it conflicts with the second law of thermodynamics. And she doesn't see how things can go from simple to complex. She and I were having a conversation about it. (I do acknowledge evolution and want to learn more about it/understand it better). What are some things I should know that I can relay to her to continue our conversation and push my stance. (She isn't rude about it or anything; she is very open-minded - she just says she "doesn't understand it".) Thanks in advance!

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  • 8 years ago
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    "It doesn't make sense to her because she thinks it conflicts with the second law of thermodynamics. And she doesn't see how things can go from simple to complex."

    Does she believe in the existence of planets, solar systems and galaxies? All these things have developed from simply formless matter into complexer systems. Either they must be violating the second law of thermodynamics or, as seems slightly more probable, she doesn't understand that law. For example, the detail that it applies to tendencies within a closed system, and the Earth doesn't happen to be a closed system.

    Given the presumably flagrant breach of laws exhibited by the existence of galaxies, a tiny bit of biological evolution on some planet or other wouldn't even warrant a parking ticket in terms of the criminality that must be involved.

    Update

    "It's not a good argument against evolution, but the 2nd law is no friend of evolution either."

    Amen to that. Equally, it's no friend of the existence of the Sun, this Solar system and the Milky Way galaxy. Such outrages surely can't be allowed.

    "

    There are far more cogent arguments against evolution that your teacher (and you) should become aware of."

    Absolutely. There's the cogency of: "I don't believe it, therefore it's wrong". And: "I don't like it, therefore it's wrong". And: "I find it too complicated, therefore it's wrong". And: "God wouldn't do things like that, therefore either it or God must be wrong, therefore evolutionary theory must be wrong".

  • 8 years ago

    Your teacher acknowledges not understanding evolution, so by what logic could she ever possibly argue against it? She also doesn't understand basic physics, which, combined with a lack of understanding of basic biology, makes one wonder why she's qualified to be a science teacher.

    In any case, her argument regarding the second law is wrong. The second law prohibits increases in order in a closed system... but the earth is NOT a closed system. We have constant energy input from the sun. Eventually, the universe as a whole will wind down, but in the meantime, local decreases in entropy aren't prohibited.

    There's another factor to consider. The increase in order through evolution is tiny. It's incredibly gradual and occurs over millions and even billions of years. The growth of a fertilized egg into a baby involves a *massive* increase in complexity and order, and takes around 9 months. If the second law prohibited evolution, it would prohibit reproduction, growth, and other basic functions of life first. It's like finding someone who just walked 10 miles, and then trying to convince them that it would be impossible for them to walk 10 feet.

    I'd recommend passing the first two links here on to her attention (you can check them out too, but it sounds like you already have a decent grasp of the material). It has a lot of good, basic material that can help her understand evolution (if she actually *wants* to understand it - if she's unwilling to learn, then she has no business being a teacher at all). The third link is for you. It has a list of virtually every creationist argument you'll ever hear, plus an explanation as to why said arguments are wrong. Don't forget the arguments *for* evolution, since you can't argue a point solely by arguing against the alternative (though creationists love to try). The information in the last link is helpful, though.

  • James
    Lv 4
    8 years ago

    What else becomes more complex forever? Organisms become more complex from conception to adulthood but all eventually grow old and die. Entropy ultimately prevails dispute all the food energy consumed. Darwinian evolution stands out as a sore thumb as the only concept in the known universe that goes on forever gaining complexity. Being unique in this sense is never a good sign for a theory. They claim claim that it does not violate the laws of thermodynamics but do not actually provide proof of such. Is natural selection efficient enough to overcome the staggering numbers of negative mutations in extremely complex organisms to accomplish this? Darwinian evolution cannot be experimentally tested much less repeatedly retested and confirmed yet they "know" it is fact. The concept can be molded to explain virtually all possibilities. It is not falsifiable, therefore not scientific. It is a type of particularly dogmatic type of religion as betrayed by the conceit and contempt displayed by many of its believers.

  • 8 years ago

    Is the second law that the entropy of the universe is always increasing? If so then this does not mean that at any point that order (evolution) cannot exist. What it says is that in order to create order to create order then you must create disorder elsewhere. Think about it. Humans are very ordered beings, but this does not come without a cost. We use up extreme amounts of resources (burning things, cutting things down, using soil) and energy which creates disorder elsewhere in the universe. Just because humans have evolved into complex beings does not mean that we didn't disturb our surroundings intensely during the process

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  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    Local order can increase at the expense of greater disorder elsewhere. Here on Earth sunlight energy is captured to power order. The sun is running down, so to speak. You'll also note that your refrigerator works: energy is used to maintain the greater order state in there.

    > how things can go from simple to complex

    Check out crystal formation. A few rules, favorable conditions, et voila. Snowflakes. Cool, eh?

    Your science teacher does not have a science mindset. This person should consider teaching something else, like, say, Spanish. If she were really open-minded or science-inclined, she would have googled all this stuff herself long ago.

    ==> Your teacher sucks. Picture Jeff Foxworthy telling her, "You are NOT smarter than a fifth grader!"

  • CRR
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    It's not a good argument against evolution, but the 2nd law is no friend of evolution either.

    The Second Law of Thermodynamics states simply that an isolated system will become more disordered with time. You can have a local decrease in disorder (e.g., on the earth) balanced by an increase in disorder elsewhere, without violating the Second Law.

    Open systems still have a tendency to disorder. There are special cases where local order can increase at the expense of greater disorder elsewhere. One case is crystallization. A crystal forms because the regular arrangement, determined by directional forces in the atoms, has the lowest energy. Thus the maximum amount of heat is released into the surroundings, so the overall entropy is increased.

    The open systems argument does not help evolution. Raw energy cannot generate the specified complex information in living things.

    There are far more cogent arguments against evolution that your teacher (and you) should become aware of.

  • nosson
    Lv 4
    8 years ago

    She is right. Acciddent mutations cant be responsibple for genetic code. On the other hand this is good evidence that evolution happned. But who said it happned through random mutations?

    I think the first orgenism was created to develop in to all the others. And also have the ability to adapt.

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