Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsEngineering · 8 years ago

Since the electric car has long been invented, why do we still use gas vehicles?

11 Answers

Relevance
  • thomas
    Lv 7
    8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    There are many reasons. I'll cover the main ones.

    First there's the battery. Right now it's not possible to make long commutes without stopping to recharging the battery. That leads to the second problem.

    No infrastructure for it. When your running low on gas it's not hard to find a station to fill at so you can keep going. Not so with electric. Plus with electric you have to actually sit & wait for the recharge. With gas it's far faster to fill & go.

    Third, funding. Who is going to pay to install electric recharging stations when there aren't many electric cars in the area to use it? Who's going to buy an electric car when there are no recharging stations nearby? Until someone makes the first move & forks over the money nobody else will.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 8 years ago

    Surprisingly there are typically long periods of delay between when a major new innovation is "invented" and when it is marketed and popularized. What is unusual is the rapid pace of electronic innovations so that some expect all inventions to be like these.

    The electric car was invented around 1820. By 1900 there were more electric vehicles than gasoline which was a more recent invention. But by making a hybrid out of the gasoline vehicle with an electric starter the petrol vehicle became more popular. Rapidly expanded infrastructure and buyouts of rail transportation made the petrol vehicle workable as a transportation system and the only real alternative.

    Now electrics and to some extent rail are making a comeback but they are fighting an entrenched petrol system.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 8 years ago

    Electric is a new technology. The electric cars of the 1980s don't really count--whether the technology had a chance or not (most say they were premature in releasing it), the businesses failed and those cars bear little resemblance to hybrids and electric cars today.

    The short answer is money. We are slowly developing technology that could replace gas, but it isn't cheap--electric and hybrid cars cost almost double what a gas car does. As the technology gets better it will get cheaper and then you'll see a lot more electric cars. There are already laws in place that new cars by 2025 will get 40 miles to the gallon or better. It just takes time to learn to make this new stuff more cheaply so it can be used by nearly everyone.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 8 years ago

    Because they don't really have the performance a gas vehicle has(Unless,maybe it's the Fisher Karma/Tesla Roadster but they cost quite a sum of money),and in anyway,I believe all electrical cars too needs Gas at some point when they ran out of electric juice for their vehicle.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 8 years ago

    Mostly because battery technology and energy levels do not yet come close to the energy of oil. For example 1 kg or gasoline contains about 12 kW-Hrs of energy. If you take into account many of the variable losses to drive a car, truck, machine, etc. to get that energy out of the gasoline we can get as low a 4 kW-hrs, that 4000 Watt-Hours of energy. The best Lithium Ion battery we have today is about 150 Watt-Hours of energy per kg.

    That's why we don't have electric vehicles everywhere.

    Hope this helps,

    Newton1Law

    • Login to reply the answers
  • jamner
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    try to be inquiring for the remedy for most cancers and HIV to boot. it really is all relative. at the same time as it contains seems, it feels like you're speaking about a majority of those first technology electric powered autos that are more beneficial like NEV's. they are quirky searching, cost effectively made and basic. maximum won't be able to even go previous 35 mph so as that they are highly a lot golf carts on steroids. the hot electric powered autos that they are mass generating are literally not gruesome. they in basic terms look like all different subcompact (which many are starting to be highly stylist) like the the Nissan Versa which seems plenty like the Leaf, or a downsized Rogue, the Audi A3 or perhaps the hot Ford Festiva. they are small today because our modern technologies dictates that, yet which will replace at the same time as new technologies get up. call for drives that. all of them waiting have low-cost conversion electric powered autos, one is termed the White Zombie, that ought to triumph over any gas dragster on the lot, absolute self assurance with a lap time of decrease than 5 seconds on the quarter mile. they could positioned a humorous motor vehicle next to it, and at the same time as the tires are smoking, the Zombie is all waiting one hundred feet down the song, and doubling % swifter than then dragster will attain. The torque in an electric powered motor vehicle can destroy human beings's necks if no longer adjusted wisely. Batteries are starting to be better, and charging technologies is convalescing today. they have a short charger than can value the present batteries which will be on the Leaf in quarter-hour. In many years it is going to in all risk be even swifter, and probably more beneficial accessible. With the worry on means interior the battery, the load of the motor vehicle dictates distance, so if you're a small individual, and also you're literally not wearing all sorts of junk on your motor vehicle, the Leaf is determined at one hundred miles before the subsequent value. You throw in 4 chunky human beings and the kitchen sink and also you should get 40 miles out of it. a minimum of the forged information is that our authorities is poised to take the $7500 tax credit and bump it to $9500 for buying a sparkling electric powered motor vehicle. which will take the Leaf to $23,500 at tax time. those autos are starting to be more competitively priced each and each of the time.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Sean K
    Lv 5
    8 years ago

    The car company and dealer make little money on a new car purchase. Most of the money to be made is from oil changes, mufflers, parts, etc.

    An electric vechicle uses thousands of fewer parts. That means less can go wrong. Usually if an electric motor goes you just change two bearings.

    It comes down to profit.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 8 years ago

    People didn't toss away their VCRs the day the DVD player arrived.

    *

    Change takes time, no matter the advantages involved. With DVDs, we had to wait for studio acceptance, and the release of many movies on disk. We had to wait for prices to come down - the first DVD players cost $1,000. We also had to wait for technological improvements, like recordable DVD technology to arrive.

    *

    Electric cars are close to the beginning of this process.

    *

    Prices are just now beginning to come down - the Mitsubishi MiEV is just $21,500 after rebate, for example, and the Volt can now be leased for just $269.

    *

    Technology improvements are just around the corner - Tesla already has an electric car with a 300-mile range, and Nissan has demonstrated 10-minute recharging. Imagine when both of these features are combined.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 8 years ago

    One reason that hasn't been covered is the question of air pollution and lifetime costs.

    Since almost 40% of the energy generated in the US is from coal powered plants and much of the electricity for electric cars comes from generated power independent of the car it self, there is no reduction in pollution.

    Because of the need to replace the batteries periodically, you have a cost that much higher than maintaining a gasoline engine.

    Finally the electric car is very expensive and has to subsidized in the US for people to purchase them.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    Switching from gas to electric isn't as simple as a lot of people think - even if everybody was 100% on-board with it, and oil companies didn't have a vested interest in keeping the gas flowing, there would still be all of the companies that manufacture the components for gasoline powered cars (engine blocks, pistons, valves, crank/cam shafts, exhaust, etc.) that would have to be closed or retooled extensively to manufacture parts for electric drive trains, and staff that would have to retire or learn entirely new skills.

    Battery technology has increased significantly, but they are still expensive to make, require special materials (lithium is inexpensive - but will go up as the demand increases, but nickel and cobalt are pricy - although that helps make it cost-effective to recycle them), they are heavy, take time to charge, and run out quickly (and will only run out quicker as they age).

    A lot of the resistance to electric cars comes from 'range anxiety', and even though the pure-electrics boast some pretty impressive ranges (and the gas/electrics increase this even more) there is still a mindset that 'I can get gasoline just about anywhere, it only takes a minute to fuel up, and even if I run out, all it takes to get me back on the road is a can full (and maybe some legwork).

    Charging stations are becoming more common, I have done electrical design for a few that even incorporate solar panels - which brings up another thing people often overlook - which is what the increased demand on the electrical grid that switching completely over to electric cars would require in the way of infrastructure. Unfortunately - even at 480V 3-Phase, it takes considerably longer to put a usable charge (much less a full charge) on an electric vehicle, and it's rare to find a high voltage one like that anywhere other than a dealership - a 240V 1-Phase service at your house takes hours.

    You are okay as long as you remember to plug it in at night (and can take advantage of the lower off-demand hour cost of electricity in some areas - of course that might not last long if there was a high demand for charging cars at night), and as long as your power doesn't go out, or the breaker doesn't trip (although they probably have ways of monitoring it from your phone or something). Eventually they will probably have mobile charging trucks or something roaming around waiting for calls from stranded people (although I'm sure they would charge a pretty penny).

    They have attempted to decrease the weight of electric vehicles while maintaining strength through the use of modern materials like carbon fiber, but this adds even more to what tend to be somewhat prohibitively expensive vehicles for the average person. Make them too light/fragile, and they become dangerous and unwieldy - proper placement of the batteries to equally distribute the weight is key, but they still have to meet minimum safety standards, as well as compete with heavier gasoline vehicles that are going to be around for some time even if a major shift to electric vehicles starts.

    Speed is one thing they don't have to worry about - AC induction motors are more than capable of producing the kind of horsepower and torque necessary. You probably aren't going to win a lot of races in a Volt or Leaf, but the 'Tesla Roadster' is capable of decimating even most powerful gasoline fueled exotics on the planet. It was this 'proof of concept' that electric cars needed to show that you weren't sacrificing power when you ditched gasoline. One of the best things they could probably do (and is probably already done at a smaller scale) is to promote electric vehicle racing - which is where a lot of the innovations in vehicles come from in the first place.

    It's not limited to cars either - I have ridden one of 'Zero Motorycles' off-road models, and it was un-f**king-believable - no gears, no noise, no fumes - just 100% torque at any speed! The clips of their bikes eating just about anything on two (or four) wheels are insane!

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.