names in Japanese anime shows.?

ok so when someone calls someone eals Name-sama.. what dose sama mean and like someone would call someone eals sempi or something... can someone help me and tell me all of them or at least all the impotent ones.

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  • Dick
    Lv 6
    8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Here's a list... not comprehensive

    Common honorifics

    San

    San derived from sama , is the most commonplace honorific, and is a title of respect typically used between equals of any age. Although the closest analog in English are the honorifics "Mr.", "Miss", "Mrs.", or "Ms.", san is almost universally added to a person's name, in both formal and informal contexts.

    "San" can also be used in conjunction with nii or onii. Nii or nii-san is a shorter way of saying onii-san. It means older brother. It is more respectful to say onii-san or nii-san when speaking to your elder brother, than by calling them by their name.[1]

    Chan: a diminutive suffix; it expresses that the speaker finds a person endearing. In general, chan is used, but is not limited to, babies, young children, grandparents and teenage girls. It may also be used towards cute animals, lovers, close friends, any youthful woman, or even between friends. It can be used for males in some circumstances, but in general this use is rather condescending or intimate. Using chan with a superior's name is considered to be condescending and rude.

    Kun: is used by persons of senior status in addressing or referring to those of junior status, or by anyone when addressing or referring to male children or male teenagers. It can also be used by females when addressing a male that they are emotionally attached to or have known for a long period of time. Although kun is generally used for boys, that is not a hard rule. For example, kun can be used to name a close personal friend or family member of either gender. Also, in business settings, young female employees may also be addressed as kun by older males of senior status. It can also be used by male teachers addressing their female students.

    Sama

    Sama is a markedly more respectful version of san. It is used mainly to refer to people much higher in rank than oneself, toward one's customers, and sometimes toward people one greatly admires. When used to refer to oneself, sama expresses extreme arrogance (or self-effacing irony), as with ore-sama ("my esteemed self"). NOT cool.

    Sama customarily follows the addressee's name on postal packages and letters and in business email.

    Sama also appears in such set phrases as o-machidō sama ("sorry to keep").

    Senpai is used to address or refer to one's senior colleagues (lower rank black belts) in a school, a dojo, sports club. So at school, the students (gakusei) in higher grades than oneself are senpai. Teachers are not senpai. Neither are students of the same or lower grade: they are referred to as kōhai or gakusei. In a business environment, colleagues with more experience are senpai, but one's boss is not a senpai. Like "doctor" in English, senpai can be used by itself as well as with a name. Due to the phonological rules of the Japanese language, although spelled senpai, the n sound turns to an m sound, thereby being pronounced sempai.

    Sensei literally meaning "former-born") is used to refer to or address teachers, doctors, politicians, lawyers, and other authority figures. It is used to show respect to someone who has achieved a certain level of mastery in an art form or some other skill, and is also applied to novelists, poets, painters, and other artists. In Japanese martial arts, sensei typically refers to someone who is the head of a dojo. As with senpai, sensei can be used not only as a suffix, but also as a stand-alone title. The term is not generally used when addressing a person with very high academic expertise; the one used instead is hakase (lit. "doctor" but the actual meaning is closer to "professor").

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  • 8 years ago

    *San* derived from sama , is the most commonplace honorific, and is a title of respect typically used between equals of any age

    *Chan* In general, chan is used, but is not limited to, babies, young children, grandparents and teenage girls. It may also be used towards cute animals, lovers, close friends, any youthful woman, or even between friends. It can be used for males in some circumstances, but in general this use is rather condescending or intimate. Using chan with a superior's name is considered to be condescending and rude.

    *Kun* is used by persons of senior status in addressing or referring to those of junior status, or by anyone when addressing or referring to male children or male teenagers. It can also be used by females when addressing a male that they are emotionally attached to or have known for a long period of time

    *Sama* is a markedly more respectful version of san

    *Senpai* (literally meaning "former-born") is used to refer to or address teachers, doctors, politicians, lawyers, and other authority figures. It is used to show respect to someone who has achieved a certain level of mastery in an art form or some other skill, and is also applied to novelists, poets, painters, and other artists.

    Source(s): wikipedia
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  • KC
    Lv 4
    8 years ago

    When you add "sama" to the end of a name, it's sign of respect for that person.

    "sempai" is what you would call your upper-class men, for instance if you were in 9th grade, all the 10th, 11th, and 12th graders would be your "sempais"

    "Kouhai" is the exact opposite. Like, if you were a 12th grader, all the 11th, 10th, and 9th graders would be your "Kouhais."

    Other important ones are

    "san" which is similar to "Mr" "Mrs" "Miss" etc

    "chan" is a cute way to call someone. It's mostly used on girls, but it can be used on guys.

    "kun" is used when your addressing someone close to you. It's a more informal way to address someone. It would rank under "san" but above "chan" in terms of formality.

    Another important one would be when you don't add honorifics to the end of a name. It suggests that you're really close to that person, and gives off a sense of intimacy. Usually people are given permission to address a person without honorifics, but if a person addresses someone without an honorific without permission, it can be very rude.

    Here's a list of Japanese honorifics if you want to read more about it

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_honorifics

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  • 8 years ago

    Sama is used as a formal and respectful part after a name. You should only use it with someone whom you respect a lot or royalty etc..

    Senpai* is used for a student who you look up to and is older than you. You can also use Senpai in work areas, so long as you respect them.

    The opposite of Senpai is kouhai which is someone who is younger than you and you've taken care of them, for you information

    Source(s): Studying 3rd year of Japanese
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  • 8 years ago

    Sama is used when refering to someone you greatly respect or when addressing someone of much higher status. Sempi is used when address someone off closer status but is your close senior in either age or skill.

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  • 8 years ago

    If I called you Zachary-sama it would be the English equivalent of saying, Lord Zachary. You say sama to someone with higher power. And senpai... If I was in 11th grade and you were in 12th grade I would call you Zachary Senpai because you are an upperclassman. So use Senpai for people older than you. And kun is for boys, Zachary-kun. And chan is for girls, Carissa-chan (that's me! :p) You can say chan for boys but for really young boys or boys you know really well. San is like saying mr. Or mrs. Zachary-San. And that's all the basic ones :p oh wait! Onii-San/chan is for older brothers, Zachary onii-san. And onee-chan/San for girls, Carissa onee-chan :D

    Source(s): Otaku!
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  • Akira
    Lv 5
    8 years ago

    sama means Lord usually and Sempai is a term for an upper class man. Hime is princess. Chan is for a close friend. and the others like kun, sand etc are just honorifics for people you know like acquaintances or something like that.

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  • 8 years ago

    'Sama' is a very formal honorific, used when naming someone with a status well above one's own. 'Senpai' is an honorific used specifically by lower-ranking students when naming higher-ranking students.

    See here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_honorifics

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senpai_and_k%C5%8Dhai

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