Sarah asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 8 years ago

"Thank you sister" in icelandic?

Please help native icelandic speakers! What is the proper way to say "thank you, sister" in icelandic? I do not trust online translators!

4 Answers

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  • 8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    you could say:

    "thank you, my beloved sister"

    "takk fyrir, elsku systir mín"

    or

    "thank you, my little/big sister"

    "takk fyrir, litla/stóra systir mín"

    that would not sound strange in English nor Icelandic.

    Source(s): brain
  • 6 years ago

    "Thank you sister" in icelandic?

    Please help native icelandic speakers! What is the proper way to say "thank you, sister" in icelandic? I do not trust online translators!

  • 8 years ago

    @ B K: That's true, but then again, people don't generally say "Thank you sister" in English. It's usually either just "Thank you" or "Thank you, <nickname>". Icelandic sounds, to a person who grows up speaking English, very old-fashioned, like old English (for a reason; it's changed much slower than most other European languages - it's rather fascinating that way). You often say (various declined forms of) things like "systir mín" (sister-mine), "mamma mín" (mother-mine), or even refer to friends that way - for example, "Karen mín" (Karen-mine). Modern English never uses those noun-adjective forms, and rarely uses the adjective-noun forms when addressing the person in question (I.e., you can say "I gave it to my sister" but rarely would you say "I gave it to you, my sister" - and you'd almost never say "I gave it to my Karen"! :) ).

    It's kind of funny, but what the person wanted translated from English to Icelandic actually sounds more natural in Icelandic than it does in English. :)

  • B K
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    More importantly would be, what does it mean in English? No one calls their sister "sister".

    Thank you, sister. - is what you would say to a nun.

    @þjarki If you said "Thank you, my beloved sister" in English, people would think you were being sarcastic - because no one speaks like that in English today, perhaps in the past, but not now.

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