.308 vs 30-06 vs 300 Win Mag?

Alright so I'm going to be buying a gun in a little while and I think what I want to do is get a Remington 700 sps to start me off and then make changes to it down the line (new stock, new scope, maybe a new trigger etc) Where I'm stuck though is what round I want to get it in. My favorite is the 300 Win Mag followed by the 30-06 because I'm a hot blooded young man who is only excited by obscene displays of power. But seriously I like it because it just seems more impressive. Now obviously It will come down to what I prefer firing once I try out a few different things but in the mean time I just want to ease my mind by getting some comparisons. So what I want to know is...

-The approximate barrel life of each round (given that I will clean the barrel properly and give the barrel at least 30-60 sec to cool in between shots)?

-How much it costs to get the barrel of a Rem700sps barrel replaced for someone living in Melbourne, Australia?

-What would you compare the recoil to for each round (as in getting punched hard/hit with a hammer) and how much will a limb saver save my limb?

-How much are other people at the range going to hate my guts for bringing one of the larger rounds?

-How much will a reasonably cheap (lets say Federal- cheap but not toxic) round cost for each for someone living in Melbourne, Australia?

-Also, what scopes would you recommended for shooting between 100-1000 meters?

No I don't expect to leap right in to making 1km shots but I'd sure like to try once I start getting better. I'll be using this for target shooting mainly but I want to be able to use it for hunting too. Top answer to whoever answers each question for all rounds (or at least tries to) I'd prefer answers based on experience than googling and any extra information or tips is much appreciated.

Update:

Okay guys I guess I understated this when I said "No I don't expect to leap right in to making 1km shots but I'd sure like to try once I start getting better." What I meant to say is of course I'm not going to be making shots anything like that for a long time to come. All I'm saying is I want to know which round does that best. Yes, my shooting experience is limited to .22lr (as far as rifles go anyway) but give me a break, everyone has to start some where. The 30 caliber rifle is a goal I want to reach. I want to work my way up to it and then by my own and when I do, I want to make sure I made the right choice based on what I want to do.

Also as for accuracy I hear all sorts of claims for and against the accuracy of the 06. Can someone give me some scientific evidence that proves that it is any less accurate than the .308 or 300wm?

Update 2:

Tex - You are the only one having trouble answering my questions mate, pretty sure I have more of a clue what I'm talking about than you do. And no I will not get a .50 I'm not a cod nut that just wants some silly cannon to brag about, I'm simply trying to work out which .30 suits me best.

9 Answers

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  • 7 years ago
    Best Answer

    Hello Jack!

    I think the Remington Model 700 SPS is the right way to go, but not just any SPS. Lean toward either the Model 700 SPS Varmint in .308, or the Model 700 SPS "Long Range" in either 7mm Remington Magnum or .300 Win Mag, these are the only factory built Remington SPS's with the heavier varmint profile barrel that you would need for long range shooting, they are best for long range accuracy.

    The key to 1000 yard/meter shooting is keeping the bullet "supersonic" at the target. The higher the range elevation, the "slower" the speed of sound. The .308 is marginal for 1000 yard shooting. IF the "Long Range" were available in '06, that would give you a better margin. AS much as I like the .308, and that ammo is more readily available, 1,000 yard/meter shooting (especially at sea level) is pushing the capability of the round. If I were you, and reloading components are somewhat available to you, I would lean toward either the 7mm Rem Mag or the .300 Win Mag over the .308 ... both will get you to the 1,000 yard/meter target above supersonic speed.

    Barrel life for a .30 barrel fired in competition settings is about 3000 rounds ... a little less for the magnums. For the 7mm Rem Mag, you are looking at about a 1500 round accuracy life, because the magnum rounds tend to "erode" the throats of the barrels more quickly.

    Barrel replacement cost is dependent upon the 'smiths in Australia and their going tariffs. I would lean toward a Hart, Douglass, or a Kreiger barrel over a factory barrel. Price would be dependent upon cost after importation and the 'smith's rate to install and chamber the barrel.

    Recoil for the 7mm Rem Mag and the .300 Win Mag will be in the 20-28 foot pound range ... about 1.5 times the amount of the .308/.30-06 and perhaps twice the amount of a 12 ga shotgun. I can not offer an answer relative to a limb saver, since I have no experience with them.

    Using a .308/'06/.300 Win Mag or a 7mm Rem Mag should not be too offensive for your neighbors at the range, especially if they are wearing proper hearing protection. The muzzle blast should not be terribly more than what you get from a .303 Enfield round.

    Here in the states, .308 and .30-06 is running about $1US a round. Magnum ammo is running about $1.30US, depending upon where you find it. Unless I can get a good price on .308/.30-06 Military match ammo, I tend to reload my own, which is cheaper. When you are shooting 1000 yards/meters, you need match grade ammo, which surplus isn't! You need a high ballistic coefficient (BC) and the terminal velocity that surplus ammo does not provide. I tend to reload 99.9% of my match grade ammo with Sierra HPBT MatchKings. Both the 7mm and the ,30 MatchKings are PROVEN for 1,000 yard/meter distances. You will need to get into reloading. Check out the prices of powder, bullets, and powder locally, along with the price of brass.

    For 'scopes, I would lean to the Weaver T24 or a comparable Leupold design for target, and a lower powered scope, such as a 6x. Here in the states, for 1000 yard shooting, we have to shoot primarily iron sights, and then some scope matches.

    With respect to accuracy potential, given ammunition that is mated to your rifle, and a proper match grade bullet, your rifle (provided it has a "heavy barrel") should be able to deliver 1 MOA groups (or better) at 1000 yards/meters, provided you have/develop the skill to deliver it.

    To better understand the complexities that you must overcome for 1000 yard/meter shooting, you need to have some resources. Try to get a copy of the Sierra Reloading manual (or comparable in Australia) and a copy of the Sierra Infinity ballistics program. That program is invaluable to long distance shooting!

    When you start shooting long range, you need to find out what bullet your rifle shoots best with whatever powder/primer/brass combination. This requires a lot of range time for load development. What helps to make this easier is if you have a chronograph, and while you shoot for "group size", you also so to measure the bullet velocity and search for the best/lowest standard deviation in velocity. The reloading compromise you want to get to is the best group size WITH the lowest velocity standard deviation. You might get lucky right off the bat, but this could also take you a month or two of range time ... bottom line is, you must be patient and diligent!

    If you contact me via email, I can provide you the name of a fellow Aussie that can help point you in the proper direction for long range shooting!

    Good luck and good shooting!

    ETA: If your heart is set on a .30, go with the .300 Win Mag.

    Source(s): Master Class competitive rifleman Expert Class competitive pistol shot Reloader of over 124,000 rounds Over 30 years of firearms and reloading experience NRA Endowment Life Member
  • rialmo
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    30-06 Vs 300 Win Mag

  • 7 years ago

    some quick answers for your questions

    The approximate barrel life of each round (given that I will clean the barrel properly and give the barrel at least 30-60 sec to cool in between shots)? None are really known as barrel eaters but the 308 will have the longest barrel life followed by the 06 and then the 300 mag

    -How much it costs to get the barrel of a Rem700sps barrel replaced for someone living in Melbourne, Australia? No Idea but the cost should be similar for all three

    -What would you compare the recoil to for each round (as in getting punched hard/hit with a hammer) and how much will a limb saver save my limb?308 with 150's is pretty mild, 06 just a bit more than the 06 and 300 mag is a pretty strong kick

    -How much are other people at the range going to hate my guts for bringing one of the larger rounds?300 mag is definitely a lot louder than the other two. No real difference in noise between the 308 and 06

    -How much will a reasonably cheap (lets say Federal- cheap but not toxic) round cost for each for someone living in Melbourne, Australia? For general hunting ammo the 308 and 06 are about equal(308 surplus is about half of regular ammo and you can't find the other 2 in surplus ammo) Add %50 for the 300 mag

    -Also, what scopes would you recommended for shooting between 100-1000 meters?

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    I don't understand what you are trying to do here. Are you only target shooting or hunting as well?

    1000 yard shooting is no breeze, I will tell you right now. I consider myself a good shooter. I would expect myself to shoot decent groups with a rifle that I am comfortable with and fits me good out to about 350-400 yards and that's pushing it. After that, I might as well not even try, because it will be a waist of money per shot, because I probably won't hit the target.

    You sound like you have never shot anything except maybe a .22. Sorry if I am wrong. If 1000 yards is your goal, and you want to be as low cost as possible, I would suggest going to either .308 or 300 win mag. And I would probably knock of the 300 win mag, because after a box of ammo, you aren't going to want to shoot any more. And shooting at 400+ yards takes a lot of practice.

    I would suggest you lower your goals first as well. Why don't you start out with a goal of working up to 500-600 yards? I would suggest you look at the Remington SPS Varmint in .308. Put a McMillan custom stock on that fits you nicely, and then work on the trigger.

    100-600 yards, a 4.5x12x50 would do nicely. I would probably go with a Leupold scope and Leupold mounts/rings.

    Then I definitively think I would be investing in reloading equipment to load up match loads specifically for your rifle.

    EDIT: after you get good at 5-6 hundred yard shooting, and wear that varmint barrel out which has a 1:12 twist, (which won't be good out to 1000 yards anyway) have it re barreled in a heavy bull barrel like the SPS Varmin comes in, but have the twist tightened to 1:10.

    When you first start out, you will probably be using bullet weights around 168 grain, which is perfect for a 1:12 twist barrel, but when you move out to 700-800 yards, you are going to want heavier bullets, around 178 grain. That is when the 1:10 will stabilize them better.

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  • 7 years ago

    i live in idaho usa i have hunted moose elk deer and bears. i have used both .270 win. and a .300 mag both shot just as far as the other but if you want to knock the game on its *** at 400 yards get a .300 mag but also get a 30-30 or some thing like that to practice with I have 30-30's and .300 savage and a few .22 practice is key to being good at hunting or shooting. i like a 165 gr. bullet in my .300 mag and 150's in my .270 but practice and practice some more. I also hand load all my rifles I use sierra bullets and a Verity of powders don't get a 338 un less you are a big guy the recoil with beat the hell out of you but you might like being hit with a sledge hammer in the arm and it will make you flinch and you will never hit any thing again

    Source(s): life time of hunting and shooting
  • 7 years ago

    The .308 has the lowest recoil. You can make long shots with it, but it requires practice and good optics. The US Marine Corps is able to do it, but they have heavily modified rifles too.

    .30-06 really doesn't afford you much with factory loadings. Its real advantage lies in reloading because you can load it hotter and heavier than factory, giving it an advantage over .308.

    .300 has the most recoil, but is the most accurate and has the flattest trajectory and best range.

    Are .30-cal rifles legal in Australia?

    If you want long *** 1km shots, and be able to hold the bullet's energy, than something like .338 might be better.

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    My polite suggestion is this. Get the 3006. That ballistics between a 308 and a 3006 are barely appreciable. You can make a good argument for 308 b.c it's a NATO round and ammunition should not be in short supply. A similar argument can be made for the 06. There's still plenty of GI ball floating around but the reason I suggest it is this: neither of the other calibers you mention has nearly the spectrum of ammo that the 06 has. You can get 55 grain bullets for Varmint hunting and 240 grain bullets for large game and everything in between. And if you stop at Cletus McDumbF**k's Ammo and Beer emporium out in the sticks... he's gonna have 3006 ammo(and 12 gauge). Yes the 300 Win is sexy.. but it kicks like a damn mule and the ammo is WAY expensive. If the expense of the ammo is of no concern to you then it has the best ballistics of the 3. But I've met VERY FEW people that can make accurate shots beyond 200 meters regardless of what they're shooting. And I don't mean to be rude... 1000 meters? You're kidding yourself. You want a bolt action .50 caliber for that.

  • Mr.357
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    You should probably get a Savage. The barrel is user replaceable with a action vise, a barrel wrench, and a no go gauge.

  • 7 years ago

    Fire all three and see which one enables you to actually hit the target closest to the bullseye.

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